13 black-and-white wartime photos juxtaposed with their modern-day locations.

In Wiesbaden, Germany, history buff Peter Perry saw the perfect opportunity to take some photos that were a "little bit more creative or unique than your average tourist pic."

While visiting his dad at a military base in Germany, Perry realized that some of his favorite historical sites were just a short drive away. It was days after the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, and the Wiesbaden city hall was displaying a rainbow pride flag on its balcony in a show of solidarity.

Perry remembered seeing an old photograph of Adolf Hitler on that same balcony, so he ran to a nearby drugstore and printed it out, "along with a bunch of other personal stuff," says Perry over the phone. "I didn't want to be that American in Germany only printing out a photo of Hitler."


Perry began a photo series that he calls "Then/Now," and it all started with this remarkable image:

He held up the printed out photo of Hitler, lined up the balcony and windows with the real-life city hall building and snapped away.

All photos by Peter Perry, used with permission.

He posted the photo online, and — as things on the internet often do — the captivating photo soon made its way to Reddit, where it received thousands of upvotes.

That was only the beginning. Perry has since traveled all around Germany and Prague taking similar composites that combine historic photos with their modern-day locations.

Like this image of French occupation forces in front of the Wiesbaden city hall in September 1919:

And this image, showing a French military concert in front of the same building in 1919:

This picture shows British forces in 1925 standing in formation before a tree that still exists today:

Here he matched a photo of American forces — The 270th Engineer Combat Battalion, to be exact — on a victory march through German streets in 1945:

Some of the images reveal forgotten pop culture moments overseas, like this photo of The Doors performing an outdoor concert in Frankfurt in 1968:

And Elvis Presley's visit to Bad Nauheim in 1959:

In 1968, Warsaw Pact nations invaded Czechoslovakia, and the images of foreign tanks rolling down Czech streets are unforgettable:

Perry says he's fascinated by the wartime history of Europe because it's unlike anything you can find in America.

"In Boston and stuff, you have a lot of history," Perry says. "But fortunately, we’ve never had foreign tanks rolling on our own streets. As drastic and terrible as some of these wars are, it’s interesting and kind of cool of be able to see some of the stuff that America's own soil has, fortunately, never gotten the chance to see."

And this striking photo was taken in front of the Prague National Museum in 1968:

This image shows Oskar Schindler (whose story was told in "Schindler's List"), with the people he saved, outside of his enamelware factory in 1944:

Here, The British Army of the Rhine Scottish Guard stands in formation in 1927:

The French Guard in Wiesbaden in 1922:

If there's a theme to Perry's pictures, it's that looking back at history reveals just how far we've come.

Progress — whether it's a pride flag waving where a dictator once stood or a peaceful, bustling street that was once torn up by foreign tank treads — tends to reveal itself when you look back at the ghosts of the past.

History is full of horrors, but it's also full of lessons. Perry's "Then/Now" juxtaposition is a visually captivating way to bring those lessons to the surface.

"We still have a long way to go," says Perry. "But it shows how far we’ve come."

When San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick started sitting during the national anthem—and then kneeling at the suggestion of a veteran—in 2016, he pushed the conversation about racial justice and police brutality into the U.S. mainstream. Some loved him for it, some hated him for it, but there's no question that he got everyone talking about it.

However, widespread support for his message didn't come until this year. As racial justice protests exploded across the country and spread throughout the world this spring, a distinct societal shift occurred. And as sports have started making a pandemic comeback, more and more athletes have loudly raised their voices for racial justice. Where we had seen a handful of individual athletes kneel during the anthem, we now see entire teams in various professional sports making powerful statements supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. The NFL itself has come out and publicly admitted they were wrong to try to get players to stop kneeling during the anthem.

Tonight is the first NFL game of the season, Kansas City Chiefs vs. Houston Texans. The teams has announced that they were going to do something special to make a unified statement on equality.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Crest

Some of the moments that make us smile the most have come from everyday superstars, like The McClure twins!

Everyone could use a little morning motivation, so Crest – the #1 Toothpaste Brand in America – is teaming up with some popular digital all-stars to share their smile-worthy, positivity-filled (virtual) pep talks for this year's back-to-school season!

As part of this campaign, Crest is donating toothpaste to Feeding America to unleash even more smiles for families who need it the most.

Let's encourage confident smiles this back-to-school season. Check out the McClure Twins back-to-school pep talk above!

via Twins Trust / Twitter

Twins born with separate fathers are rare in the human population. Although there isn't much known about heteropaternal superfecundation — as it's known in the scientific community — a study published in The Guardian, says about one in every 400 sets of fraternal twins has different fathers.

Simon and Graeme Berney-Edwards, a gay married couple, from London, England both wanted to be the biological father of their first child.

"We couldn't decide on who would be the biological father," Simon told The Daily Mail. "Graeme said it should be me, but I said that he had just as much right as I did."

Keep Reading Show less

Parents, teachers, and students have had to dig deep into their creativity and flexibility as back-to-school time hits, pandemic-style. From Zoom classes to hybrid models to plexiglass desk barriers, school simply does not—and cannot—look normal in 2020.

I've seen many parents fret over how and where their kids will do their online schooling. Do they need a desk? What about a quiet space? What if we don't have separate rooms for each kid? And those are just the worries about space.

With everyone's concern levels being sky high, it's no wonder the reactions to one dad's school-at-home setup were mixed. A Reddit user shared this video to the r/nextfuckinglevel subreddit, and while we don't know who the dad is, his classroom building skills truly are next level.

Keep Reading Show less