15 epic adventures this boy's lost elephant toy went on thanks to Photoshop.

Instead of telling 4-year-old Colin that his toy elephant, Fezzik, had gotten lost, his parents decided to tell their son that the stuffed animal was simply traveling the world.

Losing a favorite toy can be a devastating experience for a child, so to make sure their story was especially convincing, Colin's parents turned to a friend of theirs, who posted a photo of Fezzik on Reddit along with his backstory.

Redditors immediately responded by digitally inserting Fezzik anywhere and everywhere you can imagine, all around the world.


Thanks to the quick and creative minds on Reddit who are incredibly handy with Photoshop, Colin's parents were able to turn a sad moment into an incredible global journey and learning experience for their son.

Here are 15 of the most exotic locales Fezzik the Elephant visited:

1. Here he is in France. Ooh la la!

Image by Astrophysicyst, used with permission.

2. Here he is walking across the Great Wall of China.

Image by Astrophysicyst, used with permission.

3. Fezzik danced the hula in Hawaii.

Image by Astrophysicyst, used with permission.

4. And enjoyed a gondola ride in Italy.

Image by versachh, used with permission.

5. Fezzik hung out with Paddington Bear — another famous lost stuffed animal — in London.

Image by Astrophysicyst, used with permission.

6. And got to chill with a tiger at the Taj Mahal in India.

Image by Astrophysicyst, used with permission.

7. Fezzik even found time to go skydiving!

Image by abw, used with permission.

8. Here, Fezzik found himself among monks in Cambodia.

Image by kungfujohnjon, used with permission.

9. Before traveling to Egypt to see the pyramids.

Image by Astrophysicyst, used with permission.

10. And climbing the stone walls of Machu Picchu.

Image by Astrophysicyst, used with permission.

11. And sailing the ocean in Norway as a viking.

Image by Astrophysicyst, used with permission.

12. Finally, Fezzik found himself back with other elephants, like this one at Disney World.

Image by criticalg, used with permission.

13. And these elephants, wild like he was always meant to be.

Image by criticalg, used with permission.

14. Fezzik even found a fellow elephant interested in playing a lively game of soccer.

Image by criticalg, used with permission.

15. Even though Fezzik was miles away from Colin, Colin could sleep easily at night knowing that wherever Fezzik was, he was loved.

Image via criticalg, used with permission.

The family friend who posted the original request told everyone who participated in the Photoshop battle how moved Colin's parents were by their generosity and incredible pictures.

Colin's mom even wrote on Reddit to say that he's already begging to go to the library to check out books on places Fezzik visited on his many adventures.

This was a great way to turn a moment of loss into a positive learning experience for their son. Fezzik's adventures around the world prove there are ways parents can lessen the blow when it comes time for their child to let go of a toy or object that provides them with a sense of comfort.

Think of it as losing a special friend but gaining an exciting sense of adventure.

True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less
Canva

I got married and started working in my early 20s, and for more than two decades I always had employer-provided health insurance. When the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka "Obamacare")was passed, I didn't give it a whole lot of thought. I was glad it helped others, but I just assumed my husband or I would always be employed and wouldn't need it.

Then, last summer, we found ourselves in an unexpected scenario. I was working as a freelance writer with regular contract work and my husband left his job to manage our short-term rentals and do part-time contracting work. We both had incomes, but for the first time, no employer-provided insurance. His previous employer offered COBRA coverage, of course, but it was crazy expensive. It made far more sense to go straight to the ACA Marketplace, since that's what we'd have done once COBRA ran out anyway.

The process of getting our ACA healthcare plan set up was a nightmare, but I'm so very thankful for it.

Let me start by saying I live in a state that is friendly to the ACA and that adopted and implemented the Medicaid expansion. I am also a college-educated and a native English speaker with plenty of adult paperwork experience. But the process of getting set up on my state's marketplace was the most confusing, frustrating experience I've ever had signing up for anything, ever.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

Keep Reading Show less
via Lorie Shaull / Flickr

The epidemic of violence against Indigenous women in America is one of the country's most disturbing trends. A major reason it persists is because it's rarely discussed outside of the native community.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, murder is the third-leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native women under age 19.

Women who live on some reservations face rates of violence that are as much as ten times higher than the national average.

Keep Reading Show less