3 easy ways to protect yourself from UV rays, as told by Hugh Jackman GIFs.

Hugh Jackman is an awesome dude.

He can sing. He can dance. He can act. He can even slay villains with one hand. 

GIF from "X-Men Origins: Wolverine."


One might say he's a "jackman of all trades." OK, no one will say that, but they should.

But unfortunately, skin cancer doesn't care if you're awesome.

Jackman announced on his Facebook page this week that he had a basal cell carcinoma, a type of skin cancer, removed from his nose. 

This is Jackman's fifth run-in with skin cancer in less than three years.

In November, 2013, Jackman's wife, actress Deborra-Lee Furness, noticed a small mark on his nose and pushed him to go to the doctor. Her intuition was right, and Jackman had a small carcinoma removed. 

Since then, Jackman has had four more basal cell carcinomas removed, including the latest this week. The 47-year-old actor has always been very public about his diagnoses and treatment, often encouraging fans to get checked and wear sunscreen. 

While scary, Jackman's form of skin cancer is rarely fatal.

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer, with more than 3.3 million people diagnosed in the U.S. each year. 

A dermatologist uses an iPhone as a dermatoscope to examine a patient for symptoms of skin cancer. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

Despite its frequency, this type of cancer isn't usually life-threatening, as basal cell carcinoma rarely spreads beyond the lesion site. However, it should be taken seriously as it can cause disfigurement.

But the good news for Jackman, and all of us, is that prevention is not only possible, it's easy.

1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. And while many skin cancers are treatable, it's still wise to prevent them in the first place. 

Allow Mr. Jackman (in GIF form anyway) to walk you through three easy things you can do to protect yourself from ultraviolet (UV) rays, one of the primary causes of skin cancer. 

GIF via "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon."

1. You've heard it before, but it bears repeating: Wear sunscreen.

And do it year-round. While most sunscreens don't filter out 100% of harmful radiation, they still do a great job of protecting your body's largest organ — your skin. So slather it on and re-apply if you swim or get sweaty. 

GIF from "X-Men Origins: Wolverine."

2. In addition to sunblock, wear some protective clothing.

Since sunscreen doesn't provide full protection from UV rays, it's important to supplement your skincare routine with clothes and garments that provide additional coverage. Cover up with dark, tightly-woven fabrics on your arms and legs. It may not be the cool, effortless beach look you were going for, but your skin will thank you. 

And don't forget a hat and sunglasses. Your face needs love too. 

GIF via "The Fountain"

3. Whatever you do, avoid tanning beds.

The UV light used in tanning beds is the same type of light you should be protecting yourself against when you're outdoors. If you're looking for a shot of color, head to your drug store's bronzer aisle. 

GIF from "Australia."

And one more tip, just for good measure. 

Don't be afraid to get up close and personal with your skin.

No one knows your skin like you, so give it a thorough once over on the regular. Use a mirror and really get in there. Be on the lookout for any changes to existing freckles, birthmarks, or moles. And, of course, if you develop any skin growths, let your doctor know. 

With regular checks you'll be the first to notice any changes. 

GIF from "Someone Like You."

Now have fun, be safe, and take care of yourself. Hugh would want you to.

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