A dad’s hilariously cute doctor visit with his son went viral for all the right reasons.

World, meet Debias.

Photo courtesy of Antwon Lee.

He's a little guy from Georgia currently making the internet swoon.


Debias and his dad, Antwon Lee, have been best buds since Debias was born this past August.

Photo courtesy of Antwon Lee.

Sometimes dads need to put being "best buds" on the back burner, though, and put on their parenting caps instead.

Like last month, when it was time for Debias to get his vaccinations.

Photo courtesy of Antwon Lee.

A video of Antwon and Debias at the doctor's office — filled with lots of laughs, tears, and hugs — has gone viral. And it's no wonder why.

"We're going to get these shots; I want you to look at me now," Antwon reassures his son in the video, giving Debias an encouraging pep talk. "You're gonna be good."

The video captures a candid, vulnerable moment between a father and son: "I know you're gonna cry," Antwon tells him. "But it's OK to cry. It'll be OK. It's OK to cry."

The heartwarming video turns to mostly laughs at about the 1:20 mark, though, when the actual injections begin. "Man, I know, man!" Antwon says, hugging a shrieking Debias. "Are you videotaping this?" the medical professional says, laughing. "I hope you are."  

Antwon posted the private moment to Facebook after the doctor's visit. But a friend, recognizing how great the video truly was, encouraged him to change the settings on Facebook so the public could see it.

The tender moment took off, amassing nearly 15 million views as of Nov. 2. "Good Morning America" featured the video on its Facebook page as well, garnering Antwon and Debias lots of positive attention.

"I didn’t expect it to blow up like this, to be honest with you," Antwon explains. "I didn’t even know [my girlfriend] was videoing it.”

The response to the video has been overwhelming and amazing, Antwon says, especially from fathers.

Strangers — many of them fathers themselves — have reached out to him, telling him how encouraging it was to see a vulnerable dad and his emotional son experiencing the tears that come with those early doctor visits together.  

The comments section of the video was filled with love for the two of them, with some users praising Antwon's ability to be an emotionally supportive dad when his son needed it most. It's refreshing for many users, it seems, to see a dad tell his son it's OK to cry.

Photo courtesy of Antwon Lee.

“It feels peaceful," Antwon, a first-time dad, says of fatherhood. "It’s been beautiful. I got me a beautiful, peaceful baby."

And even though the world now knows Debias as a tearful baby in a doctor's office, ironically, crying is a rarity around the house, Antwon notes. "He don't cry unless he wants his ball," the dad says with a laugh.

❤️

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This year, we've all experienced a little more stress and anxiety. This is especially true for youth facing homelessness, like Megan and Lionel. Enter Covenant House, an international organization that helps transform and save the lives of more than a million homeless, runaway, and trafficked young people.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is Delivering Smiles this holiday season by donating essential items and fulfilling AmazonSmile Charity Lists for organizations, like Covenant House, that have been impacted this year more than ever. Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a charity of your choice or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

via 1POCNews / Twitter

We're more than nine months into the COVID-19 pandemic and things are only getting worse. On Wednesday, December 2, America had its deadliest day yet with nearly 3,000 people succumbing to the virus.

America is experiencing its greatest public health crisis in generations and the only way we're getting out of it is by widespread administration of a vaccine.

However, if people don't take the vaccine, there will be no end to this horror story.

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This year, we've all experienced a little more stress and anxiety. This is especially true for youth facing homelessness, like Megan and Lionel. Enter Covenant House, an international organization that helps transform and save the lives of more than a million homeless, runaway, and trafficked young people.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is Delivering Smiles this holiday season by donating essential items and fulfilling AmazonSmile Charity Lists for organizations, like Covenant House, that have been impacted this year more than ever. Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a charity of your choice or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

Sometimes it seems like social media is too full of trolls and misinformation to justify its continued existence, but then something comes along that makes it all worth it.

Apparently, a song many of us have never heard of shot to the top of the charts in Italy in 1972 for the most intriguing reason. The song, written and performed by Adriano Celentano and is called "Prisencolinensinainciusol" which means...well, nothing. It's gibberish. In fact, the entire song is nonsense lyrics made to sound like English, and oddly, it does.

Occasionally, you can hear what sounds like a real word or phrase here and there—"eyes" and "color balls died" and "alright" a few times, for example—but it mostly just sounds like English without actually being English. It's like an auditory illusion and it does some super trippy things to your brain to listen to it.

Plus the video someone shared to go with it is fantastic. It's gone crazy viral because how could it not.

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With vaccine rollouts for the novel coronavirus on the horizon, humanity is getting its first ray of hope for a return to normalcy in 2021. That normalcy, however, will depend on enough people's willingness to get the vaccine to achieve some level of herd immunity. While some people are ready to jump in line immediately for the vaccine, others are reticent to get the shots.

Hesitancy runs the gamut from outright anti-vaxxers to people who trust the time-tested vaccines we already have but are unsure about these new ones. Scientists have tried to educate the public about the development of the new mRNA vaccines and why they feel confident in their safety, but getting that information through the noise of hot takes and misinformation is tricky.

To help increase the public's confidence in taking the vaccine, three former presidents have volunteered to get their shots on camera. President George W. Bush initially reached out to Dr. Fauci and Dr. Birx to ask how he could help promote a vaccine once it's approved. Presidents Obama and Bill Clinton have both stated that they will take the vaccine if it is approved and will do so publicly if it will help more people feel comfortable taking it. CNN says it has also reached out to President Jimmy Carter to see if he is on board with the idea as well.

A big part of responsible leadership is setting an example. Though these presidents are no longer in the position of power they once held, they are in a position of influence and have offered to use that influence for the greater good.

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