A mom listed all the things she worries about, and it's going viral.

Mom Cameron Poynter was having A DAY. Like so many moms, it often felt like she was juggling the world — groceries to buy, laundry to do, tantrums to quell, appointments to keep. It was a million little things, but they all added up in a very real way. She was emotionally exhausted. And she knew she wasn't alone in feeling this way.

Poynter took to Facebook to give a much needed salute to her fellow moms-in-arms, knowing that a little appreciation can go a long way.

"I am the keeper," she began her post. "I am the keeper of schedules ... I am the keeper of information ... I am the keeper of solutions ... I am the keeper of the peace."


"Most of the time, the weight of these things I keep resembles the upper elements on the periodic table — lighter than air, buoying me with a sense of purpose. But sometimes the weight of the things I keep pulls me down below the surface until I am kicking and struggling to break the surface and gasp for breath."

"I see you. And I salute you," she wrote to moms everywhere.

You can read her full post, which has gone viral, below:

I am the keeper.I am the keeper of schedules. Of practices, games, and lessons. Of projects, parties, and dinners. Of...

Posted by Lucky Orange Pants on Monday, September 18, 2017

What Poynter brilliantly described here is a phenomenon known as "emotional labor." Most women are all too familiar with the concept.

Emotional labor is the invisible work of absorbing other people's stress, identifying and managing others' feelings, and taking on all the responsibility of keeping relationships and families on track.

This is different from the division of labor: Who takes out the garbage or does the dishes. It's about who recognizes that those things need to be done in the first place and the mental space those tasks take up. It's about who remembers that Susie doesn't like mushrooms on her pizza but that Billy will freak out if there aren't mushrooms. It's about who has to remember to get a card and a gift for those three birthday parties coming up this weekend.

"Historically, women have been the primary caregivers for their children and while they now make up half of the work force, it takes a lot longer for cultural norms to adjust," Poynter explains over e-mail. "All of those historical norms are changing and truthfully nothing would make me happier than to have one or both of my boys grow up to be stay at home dads."

Poynter says the reaction to her post, which has been shared close to 94,000 times, has been overwhelming.

"I have heard from hundreds of people — friends and strangers — who told me they desperately needed to hear someone say 'I see you. What you do matters. You are not alone,'" she says.

Her message is inspiring, but maybe it's time this kind of praise (or better yet, help) starts coming from the men, partners, and grown children who tend to benefit from all that work.

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This year, we've all experienced a little more stress and anxiety. This is especially true for youth facing homelessness, like Megan and Lionel. Enter Covenant House, an international organization that helps transform and save the lives of more than a million homeless, runaway, and trafficked young people.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is Delivering Smiles this holiday season by donating essential items and fulfilling AmazonSmile Charity Lists for organizations, like Covenant House, that have been impacted this year more than ever. Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a charity of your choice or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

We Americans are an interesting bunch. We cherish our independence. We love our rugged individualism. Despite having pride in our system of government, we really don't like government telling us what to do.

Since rebellion is literally how we were founded, it's sort of baked into our national identity. But it doesn't always serve us well. Especially when we find ourselves in a global pandemic.

Individualism—at least the "I do what I want, when I want" idea—is the antithesis of what is needed to keep contagious disease under control. More than anything in my memory, the coronavirus pandemic has tested our nation's ability to put up a united front, and so far we are failing miserably.

I hear a lot of the same complaints from people who decry government mandates to wear a mask or governors' stay-at-home orders. We don't need a nanny state telling us what we can and can't do! This is tyranny! This is dictatorship! What ever happened to personal responsibility?

I actually have the same question. What did happen to personal responsibility?

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This year, we've all experienced a little more stress and anxiety. This is especially true for youth facing homelessness, like Megan and Lionel. Enter Covenant House, an international organization that helps transform and save the lives of more than a million homeless, runaway, and trafficked young people.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is Delivering Smiles this holiday season by donating essential items and fulfilling AmazonSmile Charity Lists for organizations, like Covenant House, that have been impacted this year more than ever. Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a charity of your choice or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

Sometimes it seems like social media is too full of trolls and misinformation to justify its continued existence, but then something comes along that makes it all worth it.

Apparently, a song many of us have never heard of shot to the top of the charts in Italy in 1972 for the most intriguing reason. The song, written and performed by Adriano Celentano and is called "Prisencolinensinainciusol" which means...well, nothing. It's gibberish. In fact, the entire song is nonsense lyrics made to sound like English, and oddly, it does.

Occasionally, you can hear what sounds like a real word or phrase here and there—"eyes" and "color balls died" and "alright" a few times, for example—but it mostly just sounds like English without actually being English. It's like an auditory illusion and it does some super trippy things to your brain to listen to it.

Plus the video someone shared to go with it is fantastic. It's gone crazy viral because how could it not.

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via Becker1999 / Flickr and Price and Sons

One of the major themes that arose out of World War II was how America's national character helped propel the Allies to victory over the Axis powers. Americans came together and sacrificed by either picking up a rifle and heading "over there" or on the homefront, they did whatever they could to help the war effort.

They bought bonds. They turned their businesses into factories. They rationed items such as meat, dairy, fruits, shortening, cars, firewood, and gasoline.

After living through nine months of COVID-19, one wonders whether today's Americans would be adult enough to make the sacrifices necessary to win such a war.

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