Alexandria Oscasio-Cortez wants to replace Columbus Day with a voting holiday.
Photo by Rick Loomis/Getty Images

It’s time to turn Columbus Day into something we can all feel good about as Americans.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn’t even taken office yet but she’s already steadily making waves on Capitol Hill.

Her latest proposal is an idea that could transform two American cultural issues that are becoming increasingly problematic: Columbus Day and voter rights. In a tweet over the weekend, Ocasio-Cortez suggested making Columbus Day a voting holiday, writing:


“While I would disagree with your complaint that Americans get too much vacation time (we work some of the longest hours of any dev country & have no Fed required paid leave), I am willing to compromise by eliminating Columbus Day to give Election Day off. See? I can be pliant.”

Doesn’t Democracy Day sound a lot better than Columbus Day?

And in case you missed the context, that was Ocasio-Cortez responding to a personal attack from a reporter who was essentially accusing the incoming House member of being lazy.

As Newsweek notes, the idea of swapping out Columbus Day for a national voting holiday started with Bernie Sanders, who proposed a national “Democracy Day” after low voter turnout in 2014, writing on his website:

“Election Day should be a national holiday so that everyone has the time and opportunity to vote. While this would not be a cure-all, it would indicate a national commitment to create a more vibrant democracy.”

“We should not be satisfied with a 'democracy" in which more than 60 percent of our people don't vote and some 80 percent of young people and low-income Americans fail to vote.”

Creating a national holiday day for voting doesn’t have to be controversial or partisan. After all, who doesn’t like holidays?

But more seriously, finding time to vote can be a real headache for people who live in states or counties that don’t have vote by mail or other more convenient options.

And while a national voting holiday creates its own set of problems (some people will still need to work, who will run the polling stations, etc, etc.) celebrating American democracy seems like something just about every American should be able to get behind.

Independence is literally the idea America was born upon and a commitment to democratically elected leaders and laws is the system on which our country was built.

True

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday are teaming up to find the people who lead with love everyday.

Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

Nomination ends November 22, 2020

Sarita Linda Rocco / Facebook

Americans are more interested in politics than ever these days. More voted in the 2020 election than in any other in the past 100 years. Over 65% of the voting-eligible cast a ballot in the contentious fight between Joe Biden and Donald Trump.

"People are very excited and paying attention even though there are all this bad news and high 'wrong track' numbers in the country," Nancy Zdunkewicz, managing editor at Democracy Corps, told The Hill.

It's wonderful to see that a greater number of Americans are standing up to be counted and demanding their voices be heard. But it's also the symptom of a deep level of discontent many people feel about their country.

Keep Reading Show less
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
via Stone Gasman / Twitter

While generational stereotypes don't apply to everyone, there are significant differences between how Baby Boomers (1944 to 1964), Gen X (1965 to 1980), and Millenials (1981 to 1996) were raised.

Baby Boomers tended to grow up in homes where one parent stayed home and the other worked outside of the house. Millennials are known for having over-involved "helicopter" parents.

Then, there's Gen X.

The smaller, cooler generation that, according to a 2004 marketing study "went through its all-important, formative years as one of the least parented, least nurtured generations in U.S. history."

Keep Reading Show less

The U.S. Surgeon General credits the new surge in COVID cases to "pandemic fatigue," but it's nothing compared to what healthcare workers on the frontlines are going through. TIME recently reported that nurses are experiencing burnout, but it often goes unseen. A nurse recently employed a social media trend to draw attention to the behind the scenes fatigue.

An ICU nurse posted her own "how it started/how it's going" photo on Twitter, and long story short, it's not going that great. The before photo of Kathryn, an ICU nurse in Nashville, was taken in the middle of April right after she completed nursing school. The after photo revealed just how much literal sweat and tears healthcare workers put in while treating people during the pandemic.


Keep Reading Show less