Biden delivered a unifying message to America at Gettysburg—without mentioning Trump once

Something extraordinary happened at Gettysburg yesterday. Due to the insane news cycle and the constant stream of COVID diagnoses coming from the White House, it got a bit buried in the media, but it shouldn't have. I'm not sure I've ever seen anything like it.

We expect presidential campaign speeches to be inspiring, and Biden's speech at Gettysburg fit that bill. Truly, it's one of the best political speeches I've heard yet. But what made it extraordinary wasn't just what he said, but what he didn't say.

In a speech on the campaign trail, less than a month before an intense election, Joe Biden didn't mention his opponent. The name Trump wasn't spoken once during his entire 25-minute speech. He didn't speak about the current president at all. Instead, he explained the kind of president he will be—not just for members of his own party, but for all Americans.

How novel. And what a refreshing break from the ugly vitriol that so often marks this stage of a presidential campaign.


America is hurting right now. Our nation is riddled with division and unrest in the middle of an uncontrolled pandemic and an economic crisis. Most of us have never seen polarization like this in our lifetime, and the uncertainty of the future has everyone on edge. At the same time, many of us have watched helplessly as acquaintances, friends, and loved ones alike have fallen prey to misinformation, from unabashedly biased fringe media to full-on kookoo bananapants conspiracy theories. It feels like the fabric of our nation is unraveling.

What we need in this moment is genuine leadership. Someone who can pull us back to the big picture and call us to our core values. Someone builds bridges and remind us that, regardless of ideology or party, we are Americans first. Someone who can dissolve tensions rather than stoke them, who doesn't divide the United States into Red States and Blue States and fan the flames of such political divisions.

Whatever your political persuasion, the message in Biden's speech is the one we all need to hear right now.

LIVE: “Battle for the Soul of the Nation"- Joe Biden Speech in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania www.youtube.com

People shared parts that stood out to them on Twitter. Here are a few highlights (but I highly recommend watching the whole thing—these quotes only scratch the surface):





We need a truly unifying message—one that doesn't come from a blatantly partisan perspective or serve only to unite one candidate's base. That unifying, presidential message came from Joe Biden yesterday at Gettysburg.

Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
True

When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

Keep Reading Show less

As I was doomscrolling through Twitter yesterday, the wording of an Associated Press post caught my eye. "The Supreme Court will allow absentee ballots in North Carolina to be received and counted up to 9 days after Election Day, in a win for Democrats," it read.

A win for Democrats? Surely they meant a win for Americans? For voters? For democracy?


Keep Reading Show less
Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
True

When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

Keep Reading Show less

Electing Donald Trump to be president of the United States set an incredibly ugly example for the nation's youth.

We know how it's affected the national discourse of regular adults. But there's no denying the conduct of a president impacts how children around the world see the example being set for them. Every day for the past four years, children have been subjected to the behavior of a divisive figure that many of their parents chose to exalt to the most powerful office in the world.

Sure, adults can make excuses for him saying he's an "imperfect messenger" or that they "didn't vote for him to be reverend," but these are all just ways to rationalize voting for a man with zero character. What a message to send to children: Act awful and you'll be handsomely rewarded.

But what if you took away the "Trump" name and examined the character traits of him as an ordinary person? More specifically, what if your daughter came to you and said this was the kind of person she was planning to date? Well, one MAGA family found out and the results are funny, insightful and quite revealing about how we somehow hold our leaders to different and lower standards than we expect from ourselves in our day to day lives.

Keep Reading Show less

After years of advocating for racial justice and calling out police brutality and seeing little change in law enforcement and our justice system, some people are rightfully fed up. When complaints are met with inaction, protests are met with inaction, and direct action is met with inaction, maybe it's time to get specific in who needs to be held accountable for issues in law enforcement.

That's exactly what Keiajah (KJ) Brooks did at a Board of Police Commissioners meeting in her hometown of Kansas City this week. The 20-year-old used her approximately four minutes with the microphone—and with the commissioners' undivided attention—to unequivocally lay out her position to each and every one of the officials in that room.

"Fair warning, I'm not nice and I don't seek to be respectable," she began. "I'm not asking y'all for anything because y'all can't and won't be both my savior and my oppressor. I don't want reform. I want to turn this building into luxury low-cost housing. These would make some really nice apartments."

"Firstly, stop using Black children as photo opportunities, 'cause they're cute now, but in 10 years, they're Black male suspects in red shirts and khaki shorts," she said. "Eating cookies and drinking milk with children does not absolve you of your complicity in their oppression and denigration..." she added, before looking directly at the police chief and pointedly calling him out by name, "...Rick Smith."

Keep Reading Show less