A Bronx teen is using social media to tutor a generation of out-of-school students in math
via TikTok

Alexis Loveraz, a 16-year-old high-schooler from The Bronx has earned over 660,000 followers on TikTok by helping fellow students with their algebra, geometry, chemistry and SAT prep during the COVID-19 pandemic.

He's a math whiz with a 4.0 grade point average at Harlem Prep High School, earning the nickname "TikTok Tutor" for his ability to teach complicated subjects with ease on the social media platform.

"How did you explain it better than my teacher?" one commenter asked. "You explain 1000x better than my math teacher!!!" another exclaimed.


Alexis started making videos before the COVID-19 pandemic temporarily closed schools throughout the country. But during the lockdown, they've been a lifeline to students struggling to keep up at a time where education has been turned on its head.

"I was, like, really shocked," Alexis told CBS2. "Things that they probably forgot like before COVID-19, this is like a refresher of what I'm, like, giving them out. It's really cool because they understand it even better the way I'm explaining it to them."

His tutorials have become so popular that they're now appearing on Google Classrooms, helping kids all over the globe keep up with their math and science skills.

"It reached places like United States, Canada, Australia, the Philippines, Singapore," he said.

@alexis_loveraz Doing SAT Math Problems, will be doing basic to complex problems! Stay tuned for more! ##sat ##college ##1600 ##democracyprep ##algebra1 ##fyp
♬ original sound - alexis_loveraz
@alexis_loveraz Doing SAT Math Problems, will be doing basic to complex problems! Stay tuned for more! ##sat ##college ##1600 ##democracyprep ##algebra ##fyp ##satmath ##ap
♬ original sound - alexis_loveraz

In a world where most teens use TikTok to make dance videos or share makeup tips, Alex's mother is ecstatic that her son uses it to help educate others.

"I'm excited about this. I know he can do this and more. I'm so proud that he helped a lot of people," said Likmilian Hiciano.

When asked what motivates him to make the videos, Alexis's response was simple: "The knowledge I have, like, I want to share it to other people."

The TikTok Tutor's popularity shines a light on the grim reality faced by students across the world who have lost at least three months of education due to the pandemic.

According to Education Week, the loss of classroom time will create "longstanding gaps in performance between advantaged and vulnerable students."

When the school bell finally rings, students will be returning to an educational system that will have been weakened by the economic and political fallout from the pandemic.

"I don't think we've had a shock to educational systems of this magnitude, at least to instructional time," said Joshua Goodman, an associate professor of economics at Brandeis University. "

"And part of that is the number of weeks and months of school students are going to be missing. But it's also the fact that a bunch of parents will be unemployed, or that their savings will have vanished, or that someone in their family is sick," he continued.

Over the next few months, the U.S. educational system will have to stitch itself back together to compensate for lost time and money due to the pandemic. But it's encouraging to know that students such as Alexis have stepped up to do their best to help fill the gaps during the lockdown.

True

As part of its promise for a brighter world, Dole is partnering with Bye Bye Plastic Bags's efforts to bring sunshine to all.

Visit www.sunshineforall.com to learn more.

True

In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

True

As part of its promise for a brighter world, Dole is partnering with Bye Bye Plastic Bags's efforts to bring sunshine to all.

Visit www.sunshineforall.com to learn more.

via Terry "TB" Brown / Twitter and The Bad Katie / Twitter

Twitter is best known as a place to get breaking news, the president's daily rants, and read a lot of terrible sports takes. It's a take-no-prisoners platform where saying the wrong thing can get you canceled.

It's a place of never-ending human interaction but very few users are looking to find romance on the platform.

That's why hundreds of thousands of Twitter users are applauding @TBrown_80 and @KatieKatCubs. They managed to do what for many seems impossible, they found true love on, of all places, Twitter.

Keep Reading Show less
via Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating effect on America's health and economy. There's no way to take the loss of over 180,000 people and 20 million jobs and spin it into a positive.

However, if there are any lessons we can take from past tragedies, it's the importance of finding some rays of hope to illuminate our way through the darkness.

Earlier in the spring, there was a significant drop in pollution, giving us a glimpse into what a cleaner world might look like. For many, the lockdown was an opportunity to spend more time with their immediate families and pay more attention to what really matters.

Keep Reading Show less