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Chelsea Handler opened up about her abortions in a candid new essay.

'Once you go forward in history, you don’t go backward.'

Chelsea Handler opened up about her abortions in a candid new essay.

If anyone knows how to tell it like it is, it's comedian Chelsea Handler.


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She's brutally honest. She detests political correctness. And she has a no-b.s. policy for anyone who wants to dictate what she should or shouldn't do with her own body: "I dare them."

In a new essay published on June 24, Handler opened up about the abortions she's had and why Planned Parenthood matters.

In the piece, published by Playboy (that link is safe to open at work, I swear), Handler notes she was an "irresponsible" 16-year-old when she had unprotected sex and became pregnant twice with the same guy.

But "we all make mistakes," she explained. And she doesn't regret accessing care at Planned Parenthood to make the best decision for herself and her future at the time.

"I’m grateful that I came to my senses and was able to get an abortion legally without risking my health or bankrupting myself or my family," she wrote. "I’m 41 now. I don’t ever look back and think, God, I wish I’d had that baby."

"We have 7.3 billion people on this planet," she wrote. "Anybody who carefully decides not to become a parent — let alone a bad parent, which is what I would have become — should be applauded for making a smart and sustainable decision.

Handler's essay came just a few days before the Supreme Court's historic ruling on Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt.

Arguably the biggest abortion case taken up by the Supreme Court since 1992, the justices ruled in a 5-3 decision that forcing abortion clinics to have surgical facilities and doctors who have admitting privileges to nearby hospitals posed an "undue burden" on a person's ability to obtain an abortion.

The ruling undid a Texas law that would have effectively closed about half the state's abortion clinics.

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“Abortions taking place in an abortion facility are safe — indeed, safer than numerous procedures that take place outside hospitals and to which Texas does not apply its surgical-center requirements,” Justice Breyer wrote for the majority.

“We conclude that neither of these provisions offers medical benefits sufficient to justify the burdens upon access that each imposes."

The court's ruling affirms (and expands) the constitutional right for a person to choose when they have a child. That's huge.

It's also something Handler is probably pretty damn pleased about.

"Like millions of women, I can live my life without an unplanned child born out of an unhealthy relationship because of Roe v. Wade," Handler wrote.

"Once you go forward in history, you don’t go backward.

Photo by Kris Connor/Getty Images.


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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.