Confused about voting changes in light of COVID-19? This hotline can help.
Lawyers' Committee

Election Protection partners including Kristen Clarke, President and Executive Director, Lawyers' Committee

True
Lawyers' Committee

As more restrictions are enacted to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus, confusion around the upcoming elections continue to rise.

Election dates and polling locations are changing as Election officials respond to the global pandemic.

Since mid-March, in response to the coronavirus, some states have postponed and rescheduled primary elections. Others have encouraged voting by mail. We have also seen the consolidation of polling places, leading to more crowded vote centers and longer waits to vote. Lack of needed voter education has led to confusion around dates and deadlines for mail-in ballots.

It is important to stay safe and follow the government's advice on social distancing, but it's also crucial to exercise your right to vote so all American's voices are heard. Voters should not have to choose between their health and their right to vote.

"In light of the tremendous uncertainties arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we urge that states do everything within their powers to make sure that all eligible voters can vote, including liberalizing to the fullest extent possible the use of absentee ballots and easing deadlines," said Kristen Clarke, president and executive director of the Lawyers' Committee. "States must move quickly but thoughtfully to ensure that all voters have full access this election season."

In order to make sure your vote counts, it's important to know your rights. With constantly changing election plans, confusion surrounding recent court rulings, and the lack of accurate voting information, it can be hard to keep up with what is needed to cast a ballot that will count.

Luckily there are resources out there to keep you informed of your rights and provide you with the necessary information to ensure you're able to get out and vote.

Election Protection, a coalition convened by the Lawyers' Committee, is one such resource. The nation's longest running non-partisan voter protection effort works year-round to ensure that all voters have an equal opportunity to vote and have that vote count.

The 866-OUR-VOTE (866-687-8683) hotline administered by the Lawyers' Committee, provides Americans with comprehensive information and assistance for all stages of the voting process. Including election dates, voter registration, absentee voting requirements and deadlines, and help to address any obstacles that might arise while trying to take part in the electoral process.

Thanks to a network of thousands of legal volunteers and over 200 partner organizations, the hotline provides vital resources to help ensure that every eligible American has the opportunity to exercise the fundamental right to vote in the 2020 election cycle.

"Throughout the election cycle, our volunteers provide voter information, document problems they encounter when voting and work with partners and volunteers on the ground to identify and remove barriers to voting," according to the organization.

Since 1963, the Lawyers' Committee has worked to advance and protect the right to vote and ensure that the right is afforded equally to all.

You, too, can help by staying informed and increasing voter awareness. Sign up for the Lawyers' Committee newsletter for the latest information on voting rights. To get updates on polling locations and election changes due to coronavirus, check out the Election Protection website and Twitter account for up-to-date information on current elections, and call the hotline if you have any questions. You can also donate to the Lawyers' Committee to help defend our democracy and fight for equal justice for all.

In the meantime, test your knowledge on voting rights with the quiz below.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

Keep Reading Show less
Images via Canva and Unsplash

If there's one thing that everyone can agree on, it's that being in a pandemic sucks.

However, we seem to be on different pages as to what sucks most about it. Many of us are struggling with being separated from our friends and loved ones for so long. Some of us have lost friends and family to the virus, while others are dealing with ongoing health effects of their own illness. Millions are struggling with job loss and financial stress due to businesses being closed. Parents are drowning, dealing with their kids' online schooling and lack of in-person social interactions on top of their own work logistics. Most of us hate wearing masks (even if we do so diligently), and the vast majority of us are just tired of having to think about and deal with everything the pandemic entails.

Much has been made of the mental health impact of the pandemic, which is a good thing. We need to have more open conversations about mental health in general, and with everything so upside down, it's more important now than ever. However, it feels like pandemic mental health conversations have been dominated by people who want to justify anti-lockdown arguments. "We can't let the cure be worse than the disease," people say. Kids' mental health is cited as a reason to open schools, the mental health challenges of financial despair as a reason to keep businesses open, and the mental health impact of social isolation as a reason to ditch social distancing measures.

It's not that those mental health challenges aren't real. They most definitely are. But when we focus exclusively on the mental health impact of lockdowns, we miss the fact that there are also significant mental health struggles on the other side of those arguments.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Gates Foundation

Once upon a time, a scientist named Dr. Andrew Wakefield published in the medical journal The Lancet that he had discovered a link between autism and vaccines.

After years of controversy and making parents mistrust vaccines, along with collecting $674,000 from lawyers who would benefit from suing vaccine makers, it was discovered he had made the whole thing up. The Lancet publicly apologized and reported that further investigation led to the discovery that he had fabricated everything.

Keep Reading Show less
via Budweiser

Budweiser beer, and its low-calorie counterpart, Bud Light, have created some of the most memorable Super Bowl commercials of the past 37 years.

There were the Clydesdales playing football and the poor lost puppy who found its way home because of the helpful horses. Then there were the funny frogs who repeated the brand name, "Bud," "Weis," "Er."

We can't forget the "Wassup?!" ad that premiered in December 1999, spawning the most obnoxious catchphrase of the new millennium.

Keep Reading Show less