Woman performs a clever—and catchy—quarantine parody of the global hit 'Dance Monkey'

One of the greatest things to come out of the coronavirus lockdown is the creative musical burst coming from our fellow humans. We watched Jimmy Fallon, Sting, and The Roots use random household items to play The Police's "Don't Stand So Close to Me." We've seen parody takes on the Bare Naked Ladies' song "One Week" and enjoyed Hamilton cast members peform "The Zoom Where it Happens."

So many pandemic parodies, so much time.


Kelsey Walsh posted her at-home quarantine version of Tones and I's global hit "Dance Monkey" on Facebook, where it's been viewed more than 3 million times. Even if you haven't heard the original song, Walsh's performance is enjoyable and impressive in its own right. Check it out:

Clever use of homemade instruments, lovely voice, totally appropriate coronavirus mitigation and quarantine lyrics—this is one of the better pandemic parodies we've seen. Well done, Kelsey.

And for reference in case you've missed it, here's the original "Dance Monkey" song. It's been making waves around the world since it was released last year, topping the charts in 20 countries. In February, it became the first song written by a woman to hit the U.S. Billboard Top 5 since 2012.

TONES AND I - DANCE MONKEY (OFFICIAL VIDEO) www.youtube.com

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