Elizabeth Warren takes on 'Pocahontas' slur in speech to Native Americans.

Donald Trump is fond of giving people insulting nicknames that, presumably, have gotten more than a few people to crack a smile: "Crooked Hillary." "Sloppy Steve." But the name he calls Elizabeth Warren has never been funny.

The Massachusetts Senator is a political lightning rod known for "persisting" in even the most heated situations. On Feb. 14, she did it again — pushing back against the "Pocahontas" slur given to her by Trump and conservative critics.

"Our country’s disrespect of Native people didn’t start with President Trump," Warren said. "But now we have a president who can’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke."


She did it in front of the National Congress of American Indians.

Warren could have easily made the remarks all about her. Instead, she had the courage to address the legacy of discrimination against Native Americans head-on during a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians' Executive Council Winter Session and Tribal Nations Policy Summit.

After going through a list of crimes against Native peoples — everything from racial slurs to tax policy — Warren made it clear the verbal attacks against her are only a funnel into addressing bigger issues.

"Washington owes you respect. But this government owes you much more than that. This government owes you a fighting chance to build stronger communities and a brighter future — starting with a more prosperous economic future on tribal lands."

That didn't stop a number of critics from going after Warren using the same insulting, offensive language and phrasing that she was criticizing.

Still, Warren didn't let herself off the hook.

Warren's nickname has its roots in accusations that Warren lied about her heritage to further her career. She decided to address this claim directly in front of the group of people arguably most qualified to reject her authenticity.

"You won’t find my family members on any rolls, and I’m not enrolled in a tribe," she said. "And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction. I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes — and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career."

It's OK to criticize Warren and anyone else in politics — and even to have a little fun along the way. But it's never acceptable to use racist tactics.

If Warren's critics were actually concerned about cultural appropriation or the health of Native American communities, they'd do something about it. Instead, they're using the opportunity to troll her for political gain.

For everyone else, it's an opportunity to turn a painful situation into a more hopeful one. As Warren told the members of the NCIA, "I’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family’s story, I’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities."

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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

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Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

Photo by Karim MANJRA on Unsplash

Forgiveness is hard for most of us, but it's harder for some than others. When we've been harmed in some way—physically, emotionally, or both—we tend to carry the pain around with us. Anger and resentment are natural responses to being hurt, of course, and the longer or more severe the wounding, the more likely we are to feel those feelings long-term.

What we usually want—or think we want—is for the person who did the hurting to acknowledge our pain. We want them to fully understand what we feel, to know the impact of their words or actions. And we want an apology as proof that the person not only get, but also regrets, what they've said or done to us.

Some of us will hold onto our anger and resentment indefinitely, waiting for that all-important apology to come before we even consider the idea of forgiveness. But if we value our own well-being, we may want to rethink that order.

You don't have to wait for an apology—or even an acknowledgement—in order to forgive. And in fact, we shouldn't.

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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

Many Americans had been hoping for an overwhelming Biden landslide win in this election. Not just the clear majority victory that it turned out to be, but a full-on tsunami that would thoroughly wash away the stain of Trumpism from America forever.

That didn't happen. And we really shouldn't be surprised by that.

As in 2016, there's a push in the social discourse to try to understand why 71 million Americans thought Donald Trump was a better choice than Joe BIden. (Cue the thousandth media interview with a rural, small-town American.) But Trumpism isn't that hard to understand. It's multi-faceted and multi-layered, but it's not complicated. In fact, simplicity is one of its key features, which I'll explain in a minute.

I am going to speak frankly and somewhat forcefully about my fellow Americans here, but first I want to be clear about my perspective. I am a political independent who would best be described as "leaning left," though I hate those kinds of labels. I have always voted for both Democrats and Republicans, including on my own state's ballot in this election. The only real passion I have for politics is my disgust with our two-party system, so don't take my words here as toeing some partisan or ideological line.


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via Nathan Paul Steve / Twitter

Adam Deering made a big bet on himself back in 2002 and it paid off. The trouble was that, at the time, the people he needed help to make it happen — Royal Bank of Scotland in Urmston, Greater Manchester — didn't have the same faith in him.

His story is a great tale about the power of believing in yourself topped by the oh-so-satisfying cherry of sweet revenge.

"I quit my job as a salesman aged 21 because I knew I had it in me to create a successful business, but I didn't have a penny to my name so I needed a bank loan," he told The Daily Mail.

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