Here's a free printable door hanger that lets neighbors know you're available to help
Annie Reneau

We know right now is a dangerous time for our elderly and immunocompromised neighbors to be exposed to their fellow human beings. And we know that those of us who are healthy need to keep our social distance from one another in order to keep everyone safe.

But what happens when our neighbors who really shouldn't go out in public at all need something? Those of us who are healthy can offer to make grocery trips or pharmacy runs for those who are elderly or medically fragile. Here's a socially distant way to offer that help.



Annie Reneau

These free door hanger printables are made to be personalized with your information and delivered around your neighborhood. Not everyone has loved ones nearby or people they can call on, so this lets people know that someone is nearby and available to pick up and drop off anything they might need.

There are two versions—one worded for couples or families and one for individuals.

Click here or the image below for the printable PDF for families and couples.

Annie Reneau


Click here or the image below for the printable PDF for individuals.


Annie Reneau

Simply print, cut along the lines, fill in your information, and deliver to your neighbors' doors. (Wash your hands thoroughly first, of course. And don't greet neighbors face-to-face—now is a perfect time for a "ding-dong ditch.") There's no way to know who needs them—even young, seemingly healthy people can have invisible conditions that compromise their immune system—so we left them at every house within a certain radius of our house.

Naturally, some may wonder about how money will change hands, but that should be worked out on a case-by-case basis. Venmo, PayPal and other online payment options are great, but some elderly people may only have cash or checks.

Even if no one ends up contacting you, reaching out during a crisis can create a greater sense of community for everyone. After all, we're truly all in this together.

True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


My husband and I had just finished watching "The Office" for the third time through and were looking for a new show to watch before bed. I'd seen a couple of friends highly recommend "Schitt's Creek," so we decided to give it a try.

My initial reaction to the first episode was meh. The characters were annoying and the premise was weird (pretentious and previously-filthy-rich family lives in a scuzzy motel in the middle of nowhere??). I felt nothing for the main characters, and I hate shows with horrible main characters that I can't root for. Even predicting that they were going to eventually be transformed by their small town experiences, I didn't see liking them. It didn't grab either of us as worth continuing, so we stopped.

But then I kept hearing people whose taste I trust implicitly talk about how great it was. I know different people have different tastes, but I realized I had to be missing something if these friends of mine raved on and on about it. So we gave it another shot.

It took a bit—I don't know how many episodes exactly, but a bit—to start liking it. Then a bit longer to start really liking it, and then at some point, it became a full-fledged, gushy, where-have-you-been-all-my-life love affair.

So when the show took home nine Emmy awards over the weekend—breaking the record for the most wins in a season for a comedy—I wasn't surprised. Here's why:

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

Keep Reading Show less

Biases, stereotypes, prejudices—these byproducts of the human brain's natural tendency to generalize and categorize have been a root cause of most of humanity's problems for, well, pretty much ever. None of us is immune to those tendencies, and since they can easily slip in unnoticed, we all have to be aware of where, when, and how they impact our own beliefs and actions.

It also helps when someone upends a stereotype by saying or doing something unexpected.

Fair or not, certain parts of the U.S. are associated with certain cultural assumptions, perhaps none more pinholed than the rural south. When we hear Appalachia, a certain stereotype probably pops up in our minds—probably white, probably not well educated, probably racist. Even if there is some basis to a stereotype, we must always remember that human beings can never be painted with such broad strokes.

Enter Tyler Childers, a rising country music star whose old-school country fiddling has endeared him to a broad audience, but his new album may have a different kind of reach. "Long Violent History" was released Friday, along with a video message to his white rural fans explaining the culminating track by the same name. Watch it here:

Keep Reading Show less