From pedicures to lawn mowing, these 13 dads remind us what parenting is all about.

There's something special about the bond dads have with their daughters.

There's often a misconception that dudes only want to raise tiny dudes. Now more men are styling their daughters' hair, understanding the difference between leggings and jeggings, attending dance recitals, and just being whatever their daughters need them to be. This shouldn't be surprising. It's called parenting.


NFL dad doing dad things. GIF via xoNecole from Pantene/YouTube.

Best of all, their daughters benefit greatly from it. Studies have shown that daughters with involved fathers tend to have more confidence, are more self-reliant, and are more successful in school and business than ones who don't.

Put simply, dads can be really important, especially when it comes to raising little girls.

With that in mind, here are 13 photos showing how some dads interact with their young daughters in their own ways. (All photos were taken from the Daddy Doin' Work Instagram feed and are used with permission.)

1. Dads are there for their daughters. Even when they come into the world a little earlier than expected.

Wait till you get to #13 for a extra-special bonus picture.

2. Dads teach their daughters that "bro time" with other dads is a lot more fun when they're around.

3. Dads know how to make it rain for their daughters. Especially when they want to test out their new umbrellas.

4. Dads teach their daughters that the "damsel in distress" thing is nonsense. Girls have the power to do anything they put their minds to. Including fixing stuff.

5. Dads teach their daughters that they have them covered if they need anything. Even if that "something" is lip gloss at a basketball game.

6. Some dads teach their daughters that being a true hero means protecting other peoples' kids as well.

7. Dads teach their daughters that hair is optional when they want to open up the salon for business.

8. Dads teach their daughters that bonding moments are not gender-specific.

9. Dads teach their daughters that they'll always try to make them feel safe.

10. Dads know that they will be the first male role model their daughters get to meet.

11. Dads have fun ways of showing their daughters the value of doing chores.

12. Dads teach their daughters that there's nothing more important than family. Even when not all of its members are connected by blood.

13. And when those babies arrive in the world a little earlier than expected (remember #1 on this list), dads know that their love will help them grow stronger.

Little boys are awesome (I know because I used to be one), but the bond that a dad has with his daughters (speaking for myself, at least) is a powerful one. Much love to the men who put in the work to ensure their little girls grow up to become strong women. And also to all the other parents out there doing the heavy lifting that don't fit into the dad category.

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Biases, stereotypes, prejudices—these byproducts of the human brain's natural tendency to generalize and categorize have been a root cause of most of humanity's problems for, well, pretty much ever. None of us is immune to those tendencies, and since they can easily slip in unnoticed, we all have to be aware of where, when, and how they impact our own beliefs and actions.

It also helps when someone upends a stereotype by saying or doing something unexpected.

Fair or not, certain parts of the U.S. are associated with certain cultural assumptions, perhaps none more pinholed than the rural south. When we hear Appalachia, a certain stereotype probably pops up in our minds—probably white, probably not well educated, probably racist. Even if there is some basis to a stereotype, we must always remember that human beings can never be painted with such broad strokes.

Enter Tyler Childers, a rising country music star whose old-school country fiddling has endeared him to a broad audience, but his new album may have a different kind of reach. "Long Violent History" was released Friday, along with a video message to his white rural fans explaining the culminating track by the same name. Watch it here:

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

@frajds / Twitter

Father Alek Schrenk is known as one of the "9 Priests You Need to Follow on Twitter." He proved his social media skills Sunday night after finding a creepy note on a parked car and weaving a lurid Twitter tale that kept his followers on the edge of their pews.

Father Schrenk was making his nightly walk of the church grounds to make sure everything was fine before retiring to the rectory, when he found a car parked by itself in front of the school.

Curious, he looked inside the car and saw a note that made his "blood run cold" attached to the steering wheel. "Look in trunk!" the note read. What made it extra creepy was that the two Os in "look" had smiley faces.

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