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Gabourey Sidibe's reaction to seeing herself on a subway poster is awesome.

The ad campaign challenges traditional beauty norms.

Gabourey Sidibe's reaction to seeing herself on a subway poster is awesome.

Last month, actress Gabourey Sidibe debuted her first-ever fashion campaign, Lane Bryant's #ThisBody.

Sure, the Oscar-nominated actress and "Empire" star has landed her share of magazine covers and feature spreads in the past, but the Lane Bryant campaign — which also included "Orange Is the New Black" actress Danielle Brooks and models Ashley Graham, Candice Huffine, and Alessandra Garcia — marked a bold new step in her career.

Sidibe recently shared a photo from the campaign on Twitter, which perfectly explains why it means so much to her — and hopefully to others as well.

"I'm STILL not over this," she wrote, accompanied by a picture of her ad plastered across a subway station wall. "Who knows how many subway posters I walked by hoping to one day feel as beautiful as the faces I passed."


In a 2009 interview with Oprah, Sidibe opened up about the difficult process of accepting herself for who she is and for what she looks like.

"My first diet started when I was 6 years old. I've never been a small girl," she said. "One day, I had to sit down with myself and deiced that I loved myself no matter what my body looked like and what other people thought about my body. ... I got tired of feeling bad all the time. I got tired of hating myself."

#ThisBody shines everywhere, all day. #BTS #WCW @gabby3shabby

A photo posted by Lane Bryant (@lanebryant) on

She's not alone, either. New York City's Girls Project reports that more than 80% of 10-year-old girls worry about being fat, and by middle school, between 40% and 70% of girls feel dissatisfied with two or more aspects of their bodies.

In a world filled with bullies and unrealistic beauty standards, girls have it rough. Campaigns like #ThisBody can help change that by showing girls everywhere that beauty doesn't have a size. This sort of representation matters.

One of the core aspects of the campaign centers on is pushing back against bullies — especially on social media.

The anonymity of social media mixed with the cruelty of society makes for a dangerous combination when it comes to the self-esteem of young women and girls. #ThisBody pushes back on weight-related insults flung by strangers.

In one of the campaign's videos, Sidibe reads a common message she receives: "I hope I never let myself get that big!" She also shares her response: "By 'big' you mean amazing and beautiful and fabulous, right?"

One thing that’s not up for debate. #ThisBody @gabby3shabby

A video posted by Lane Bryant (@lanebryant) on

The reality is that most women aren't a size 2. Somewhere around 65% of U.S. women are a size 14 or larger.

Despite the actual average size being somewhere between a 16 and 18, clothes 12 and above are usually labeled "plus-size" and in many cases aren't even available for purchase in stores.

These sorts of messages are damaging to girls, boys, women, men, and well, all of us. They warp our view of what's "average," and they demolish the self-confidence of impressionable minds. Seeing women like Sidibe, Graham, Brooks, Huffine, and Garcia not only embrace their bodies, but push back on the haters is a nice counterbalance to some of the bad in the world.

Yassssssssssssssssssssssss @gabby3shabby #ThisBody

A video posted by Lane Bryant (@lanebryant) on

Growing up, Sidibe looked at the subway posters but didn't see anyone who looked like her. Thanks to her, a future generation might not have to.

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Crest

Some of the moments that make us smile the most have come from everyday superstars, like The McClure twins!

Everyone could use a little morning motivation, so Crest – the #1 Toothpaste Brand in America – is teaming up with some popular digital all-stars to share their smile-worthy, positivity-filled (virtual) pep talks for this year's back-to-school season!

As part of this campaign, Crest is donating toothpaste to Feeding America to unleash even more smiles for families who need it the most.

Let's encourage confident smiles this back-to-school season. Check out the McClure Twins back-to-school pep talk above!

via Business Insider

The United States' suicide rate was at its highest since World War II before the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Lawmakers and health experts worry that the intense economic and social pressures that have resulted from the pandemic will exacerbate this problem even further.

One of the most effective ways that people suffering from suicidal ideation and psychological distress can get immediate help is by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255). This call center provides free, confidential emotional support form trained experts and volunteers.

It's an easy way to get help without having to wait. Ninety-seven percent of all calls are picked up within 75 seconds of the initial phone greeting.

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True
Crest

Some of the moments that make us smile the most have come from everyday superstars, like The McClure twins!

Everyone could use a little morning motivation, so Crest – the #1 Toothpaste Brand in America – is teaming up with some popular digital all-stars to share their smile-worthy, positivity-filled (virtual) pep talks for this year's back-to-school season!

As part of this campaign, Crest is donating toothpaste to Feeding America to unleash even more smiles for families who need it the most.

Let's encourage confident smiles this back-to-school season. Check out the McClure Twins back-to-school pep talk above!

When we hear about racial bias in education, we might picture things like disparities in school funding, disciplinary measures, or educational outcomes. But it can also show up in the seemingly simplest of school assignments—ones that some of us wouldn't even notice if we don't look outside our own cultural lens.

Ericka Bullock-Jones shared one such instance on Facebook, with her daughter's responses to questions on a high school ancestry assignment.

"My kids go to a pretty much all white school," she wrote. "They got an assignment yesterday asking them to talk to their relatives and document how their families came to 'immigrate' to the US. The teacher asked for details about the 'push and pull of the decision' and really made it sound like a light hearted assignment. Female Offspring was INCENSED. She is a beast - and I mean that in the best possible way. I wish I had a scintilla if [sic] her nerve, knowledge and courage when I was her age. This is what she put together to turn in for this assignment..."

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When San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick started sitting during the national anthem—and then kneeling at the suggestion of a veteran—in 2016, he pushed the conversation about racial justice and police brutality into the U.S. mainstream. Some loved him for it, some hated him for it, but there's no question that he got everyone talking about it.

However, widespread support for his message didn't come until this year. As racial justice protests exploded across the country and spread throughout the world this spring, a distinct societal shift occurred. And as sports have started making a pandemic comeback, more and more athletes have loudly raised their voices for racial justice. Where we had seen a handful of individual athletes kneel during the anthem, we now see entire teams in various professional sports making powerful statements supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. The NFL itself has come out and publicly admitted they were wrong to try to get players to stop kneeling during the anthem.

Tonight is the first NFL game of the season, Kansas City Chiefs vs. Houston Texans. The teams has announced that they were going to do something special to make a unified statement on equality.

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