German anti-masker compares herself to a Nazi victim and gets powerfully shut down by security
via Mr. Krabs / YouTube

Sure, wearing a mask can be a little annoying, but being asked to put one on by the state, a family member or business isn't tyranny. It's a common-sense move to protect the spread of a virus that's killed over 1.4 million people.

Most people understand that, but there are some who insist on putting the health of themselves and others in jeopardy by refusing to wear a mask.

These anti-maskers are incredibly frustrating to anyone who just wants this thing to be over and can't understand why anyone could be so selfish.


A security guard in Hanover, Germany has become a viral hero for standing up to a misguided woman who selfishly confused inconvenience with oppression. And, in Germany, they know what real oppression looks like.


Security guard quitt job after Covididot compare herself to Sophie Scholl on an Anti-mask rally www.youtube.com

On Saturday, Jana, a 22-year-old anti-masker was making a speech at an anti-lockdown protest when she compared herself to Sophie Scholl, a 21-year-old who was executed for standing up against the Nazis in 1943.

Scholl was convicted for high treason after having been found distributing anti-war leaflets at the University of Munich with her brother, Hans. She has since been seen as a stunning example of bravery in the face of oppression.

Jana, on the other hand, doesn't want to wear a mask to help save the lives of others.

"I feel like Sophie Scholl, since I've been active in the resistance, giving speeches, going to protests, distributing flyers," she said to a small round of applause.

"I am 22 years old, just like Sophie Scholl before she fell victim to the Nazis," she continued. She then pledged to never give up and stand for "peace, love, and justice."

Then the security guard charged with protecting her walked up to the stage and quit. "I won't go along with such bullshit," he told Jana. "I won't provide security for such bullshit."

His explanation for quitting was simple and powerful.

"This is trivializing the holocaust," he rightfully proclaimed. After a few words with Jana, he walked away and she became overwhelmed by tears. Hopefully, she cried because she realized how ridiculous her words were.

Sophie Scholl via Zev / Twitter

While Jana thought that she was being a brave person by fighting back against lockdowns, the security guard is the true hero for standing up for civil responsibility at a time when we need it most. His job is to protect people and by shutting down Jana's speech he may have saved some lives.

The only comparison that should be made between the COVID-19 pandemic and the Holocaust is that both fed on ignorance and led to senseless death and destruction.

German foreign minister, Heiko Maas, lashed out at Jana in a tweet on Sunday.

"Anyone today comparing themselves to Sophie Scholl or Anne Frank is making a mockery of the courage it took to stand up to the Nazis," Maas tweeted.

"It trivializes the Holocaust and shows an unbearable forgetting of history. Nothing connects the corona protests with the resistance fighters. Nothing!"





True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.