The first razor designed to shave other people is great news for millions of caregivers
Gillette

Jim and Carol lived an active, exciting life together as husband and wife. But when Jim was struck by a car while cycling near his home, their life changed dramatically. Jim was left needing round-the-clock care, and Carol, a retired nurse, took on the role of caregiver.

Every day, Carol helps Jim through his physical therapy and personal grooming routines. "If we don't do what we do on a daily basis to help him move forward, he'll become more and more dependent," Carol says. "Some days the challenges are very difficult."

More than 40 million Americans are in Carol's shoes, providing unpaid caregiving to loved ones who are disabled, elderly, or otherwise in need of assistance. With baby boomers getting older and people living longer, many middle-aged people find themselves caring for aging parents or grandparents. Others may have a developmentally delayed adult child at home, or a family member who has become disabled due to an accident or illness. From cooking to cleaning to bathing, caregivers help others do everyday tasks they aren't able to do for themselves.

RELATED: These glimpses into the lives of caregivers prove they're real unsung heroes.

Hygiene and grooming are a big part of a caregiver's job, and anything that makes those tasks easier is a good thing. That's why Gillette's new TREO razor, specifically designed for shaving other people, caught our eye.


According to Gillette, 4000 razors have been designed for shaving yourself. But up until now, zero razors have been designed for people who are unable to do that.

Carol uses the TREO to shave Jim's face, and impressed by how convenient it is and how well it works. "As a nurse, I'm thinking, 'How can they improve this process,'" she says, "but I really think that they have."

A Different Life Together | Gillette TREO www.youtube.com

Gillette's TREO razor was inspired by real-world conversations with caregivers and their loved ones and was pilot-tested in 2017.

"Our team noticed a conversation happening on social media about the daily challenges faced when caring for a loved one, which includes shaving," said Peter Ries, R&D Group Head at Gillette. "At Gillette we believe everyone has the right to look and feel their best. With our TREO razor, we are able to make the task of shaving less daunting for caregivers by enabling them to provide their loved ones with the dignity of a fresh shave."

The design team at Gillette pulled apart the razor as we know it and rebuilt it from the bottom up. The TREO includes a unique blade with a safety comb and grooves that prevent clogging, an ergonomic handle for better control, and built-in special shave gel that eliminates the need for water so caregivers can shave their loved ones without having to transport them to a sink.

RELATED: Turns out almost everyone loved that 'controversial' Gillette ad about toxic masculinity.

The "best a man can get" company has recently made big waves with ads that include trans people and ˚ Now, with the TREO razor, they company has taken inclusiveness one step further. Time Magazine awarded the Gillette TREO 2018 Innovation of the Year in the accessibility category and Fast Company called TREO "A Masterpiece of Inclusive Design."

Well done, Gillette.

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

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(Now might be a good time to remind people that the bones of the Affordable Care Act were built by Republican Mitt Romney, whose Massachusetts healthcare reform during his time as Governor served as a model for Obamacare.)

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The president appears to know this, because he keeps saying he's got a healthcare plan coming. The best healthcare. The most tremendous healthcare. Fantastic. Terrific. A big, beautiful plan the likes of which the world has never seen before. And it's coming soon. Very soon. So very soon. Within two weeks, he's said several different times, many months apart.

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Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

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