Here are 15 statues that we can all agree should stay up

A worldwide debate has been raging over the past few years over statues of historical figures.

People in the United States have been tearing down statues of Confederates and known racists. In Europe, people are tearing down statues of historical leaders associated with colonialism and the slave trade.

"I believe it's a paradigm shift that's happening right now," activist Mike Forcia, who helped topple over a statue of Christopher Columbus in Minnesota, told The Washington Post.


White people are "losing their ability to say this is history and this is how we write it, and this is how we teach it," he added. "We need a true history of this country in order to heal and to fix that shaky foundation, that sick foundation, that the country is built on."

Surprisingly, the movement to eradicate monuments built to racists and murderers has its detractors. Most claim that removing the statues somehow erases history. As if we will suddenly forget the Civil War happened if we don't have a big ass statue of Robert E. Lee in front of the courthouse.

Welcometoterranova's Annie Reneau put it all in perfect perspective.

The entire reason for their removal is that people are finally becoming aware of history that had been erased, through whitewashed history books and glaring omissions in the heroic stories we tell. As a result, people are making history by taking down monuments that symbolize historic erasure.

Over 20,000 people have signed a petition to remove all Confederate statues in Tennessee and replace them with statues of a national treasure who didn't fight to subjugate an entire race of people: Dolly Parton.

The petition makes a great point, why don't we honor people that we can all agree on?

There are plenty of statues of people and things across the world that no one thinks should be vandalized or set ablaze and thrown in the ocean. Here are 15 of the best.

The Bronze Fonz — Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Arthur Fonzarelli was the coolest character to ever grace the small screen. He was also a fierce protector of his friends and always stood up for what's right. He also once jumped over a shark on water skis.

via Patsy Delcine / Twitter


Freddie Mercury — Montreaux, Switzerland

The lead singer of Queen had one of the most beautiful singing voices in the history of rock and wrote some of the most memorable songs of the last 50 years including, "We are the Champions," "Bohemian Rhapsody," and "Somebody to Love."

via cb_agulto / Flickr


Oprah Winfrey — New York City

Orpah is one of the most important media personalities over the past century. Her unique blend of strength and compassion has inspired people for over five decades.

via New Age


Bruce Lee — Mostar, Bosnia

Lee was a martial artist, actor, and philosopher who is responsible for bringing martial arts films to western audiences. He also worked tirelessly for equality and to change the perception of Asians in American culture.

via Patsy Decline / Twitter


Josh Gibson — Washington, D.C.

Gibson's statue sits outside of the Washington Nationals' ballpark, but sadly, he never played in the major leagues. During his playing career, Black people were not allowed in Major League Baseball, but his incredible play in the Negro leagues earned him the nickname the "Black Babe Ruth." (Or perhaps Babe Ruth should have been known as the "White Josh Gibson"?)

via Wally Gobetz / Flickr


Large Salmon — Portland, Oregon

Nobody passes this massive statue of a salmon stuck in a brick building and thinks, "Gee, I gotta pull this sucker down." Nope, that's because salmon are among of the most dignified creatures in the ocean.


Jim Henson and Kermit the Frog — University Of Maryland

These two brought a lot of love and laughs into the world.

via zhurnaly / Flickr


Samantha from "Bewitched" — Salem, Massachusetts

The relationship between Samantha, a witch, and Darrin, a mere mortal man, proved that no matter what our differences, we can make a relationship work ... even if it does take a little witchcraft.

via Patsy Decline / Twitter


The Knotted Gun — New York City

"The Knotted Gun" was originally created as a memorial to John Lennon, a man struck down by senseless gun violence.

via Daily Photo Stream


Columbo — Budapest, Hungary

Did Columbo own slaves? No. Did he colonize a country and pilfer its national resources? No. Did he spread small pox to indigenous people. No. This statues stays up.

via Patsy decline / Twitter


The Headington Shark — Oxford, England

While this bit of whimsy seems like a joke, it actually has a deeper meaning. The shark represents the impotence that people feel when they have no control over disastrous world affairs. I think we can all agree this sentiment is universal and should stay.


via Art Russia


David Bowie — Buckinghamshire, England

David Bowie became an icon for his constant evolution from Ziggy Stardust to Lazarus. He never settled on a persona or musical style for too long, teaching us all how to embrace change.

via R P M / Flickr


Michael Jordan — Chicago, Illinois

When you're known as "the guy who did his job better than anyone else has done their job" you're deserving of a statue that stays up.

Josh Kinal / Flickr


Mary Tyler Moore — Minneapolis, Minnesota

When your name is the answer to the age-old question: "Who can turn the world on with her smile?" your statue status is secure.

via Mark Reilly / Twitter

True
Frito-Lay

Did you know one in five families are unable to provide everyday essentials and food for their children? This summer was also the hungriest on record with one in four children not knowing where their next meal will come from – an increase from one in seven children prior to the pandemic. The effects of COVID-19 continue to be felt around the country and many people struggle to secure basic needs. Unemployment is at an all-time high and an alarming number of families face food insecurity, not only from the increased financial burdens but also because many students and families rely on schools for school meal programs and other daily essentials.

This school year is unlike any other. Frito-Lay knew the critical need to ensure children have enough food and resources to succeed. The company quickly pivoted to expand its partnership with Feed the Children, a leading nonprofit focused on alleviating childhood hunger, to create the "Building the Future Together" program to provide shelf-stable food to supplement more than a quarter-million meals and distribute 500,000 pantry staples, school supplies, snacks, books, hand sanitizer, and personal care items to schools in underserved communities.

Keep Reading Show less
via Tom Ward / Instagram

Artist Tom Ward has used his incredible illustration techniques to give us some new perspective on modern life through popular Disney characters. "Disney characters are so iconic that I thought transporting them to our modern world could help us see it through new eyes," he told The Metro.

Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

In Ward's "Alt Disney" series, Prince Charming and Pinocchio have fallen victim to smart phone addiction. Ariel is living in a polluted ocean, and Simba and Baloo have been abused by humans.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

With many schools going virtual, many daycare facilities being closed or limited, and millions of parents working from home during the pandemic, the balance working moms have always struggled to achieve has become even more challenging in 2020. Though there are more women in the workforce than ever, women still take on the lion's share of household and childcare duties. Moms also tend to bear the mental load of keeping track of all the little details that keep family life running smoothly, from noticing when kids are outgrowing their clothing to keeping track of doctor and dentist appointments to organizing kids' extracurricular activities.

It's a lot. And it's a lot more now that we're also dealing with the daily existential dread of a global pandemic, social unrest, political upheaval, and increasingly intense natural disasters.

That's why scientist Gretchen Goldman's refreshingly honest photo showing where and how she conducted a CNN interview is resonating with so many.

Keep Reading Show less

Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

Keep Reading Show less