Here's what the legacy of child abuse looks like to 1 survivor.

Child abuse shouldn't be tolerated anywhere. But when it's in the public eye, it's even more important to address it.

That's why we can't let it slide in celebrity cases, even when the abusers seem apologetic.

Take the case of NFL player Adrian Peterson. The pro football running back — one of the league's biggest stars — was charged in September 2014 with reckless or negligent injury to a child after using a "switch" on his 4-year-old in a way that were said to have caused dozens of bleeding welts that, even days later when photographed by police, were obviously very painful and abusive.


He took a plea deal in the case and missed most of the 2014 season. He's back on the field this year, though and about to head into the playoffs with his team, the Minnesota Vikings.

We shouldn't stop talking about child abuse just because a public figure has been brought to justice.

Professional athletes are held to a higher standard on things like this because they’re looked up to by young and old as heroes of sorts. But heroes need to be very careful in that role.

Any abuse is serious; the pain doesn't end when the bruises fade and wounds heal. But in Peterson's case, we really shouldn't forget.

While the football player says he's changed how he disciplines his son, he still maintains he did nothing wrong in interviews even now. He blames culture and his upbringing instead.

The cartoon below, written and illustrated by a survivor, lays bare the reality for abused children in a way that really strikes home.

The illustrator and author, Scott Stantis, was inspired to create this after hearing the news in 2014 about Peterson and some of the responses to the case tried to paint his abuse as cultural.

I love, love, love this quote from the cartoon essay below about that:

“If your ‘culture’ advocates for men knocking women unconscious or tearing open the skin of a child, then your culture is corroded and needs to disappear.”

Word.

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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
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