How to get from emotion to action after the election, as narrated by amazing humans.

For people who saw Hillary Clinton as a much needed step forward for equality in this country, this week's loss was devastating.

When the 2016 presidential election results came in around 3 a.m. Eastern time on Nov. 9, many people were hit with waves of emotion as this dramatic election cycle came to a close.

What would come next for America?


Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Today, many people are grieving. But if you look around you, you'll also see people doing something remarkable: They aren't giving up.

Many folks have taken to social media to share beautiful and heart-wrenching but above all actionable words of resolve this week. These are people who still believe we're "stronger together," and they are standing tall. They're showing the nation that we will not be pushed down so easily.

So if you're feeling scared or angry or confused or sad, that's OK. It's important to take time to process the blow. But then, stand back up. The fight is not over. In fact, it's only just begun.

Here are five messages from fellow supporters that might help you get there:

1. This woman is feeling more resolved then ever to keep fighting.

"This hurts like hell, but I'm not giving up and I'm not going anywhere and I'm not going to be quiet. I'm staying right here in this goddamned country and I'm going to keep on standing up and speaking out and fighting even harder for our friends and neighbors and all people who don't feel like they have a voice, who deserve respect, who need love and support, who need to know that they're not going to be abandoned. Photo via libbyvanderploeg/Instagram, used with permission.

2. Another is trying to help others while simultaneously looking out for her own mental health.

Thank you to "the helpers" who have literally kept me alive for the past 24 hours- And of course the love of my life,...

Posted by Annie P. Ruggles on Wednesday, November 9, 2016

3. And, in the midst of fearing for this country, this man wants everyone to know he's first and foremost an ally.

While the country votes red from the center out like cancer, while you feel fear, you feel opressed, while we feel shame...

Posted by Brian Morvant on Tuesday, November 8, 2016

4. Christina learned words of hope and action can come to us in many ways. Even via text.

Sister love and wisdom and hope. #sistertherapy #love #hope #staystrong

A photo posted by @jaclynspoleti on

5. And, in the face of feeling like "them" again, this Middle-Eastern American man simply asks others to have empathy.

I'm an American born non-practicing Muslim and Middle Eastern American. I was born in the Bronx and raised in NYC and...

Posted by Mehdi Barakchian on Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Emotions only take us so far. In the coming weeks, action is the next step.

As Clinton said in her concession speech, "This loss hurts. But please never stop believing that fighting for what’s right is worth it."

It's not going to be easy, but we're not doing this alone.

Transitioning from optimist to activist.

Posted by Abbie Harper on Wednesday, November 9, 2016
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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

One of the fun surprises when you get to college is learning that most college professors are not nearly as scary as your high school teachers made them out to be. Some are tough, for sure, and there are always a few a-holes thrown into the mix, but for the most part professors are smart, compassionate human beings who care about both the academic performance and the personal well-being of their students.

But some take it even a step farther.

A college student on Twitter shared a pre-Thanksgiving e-mail she and her classmates received from a professor, and it's just the best example of real human-kindness.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
via Twins Trust / Twitter

Twins born with separate fathers are rare in the human population. Although there isn't much known about heteropaternal superfecundation — as it's known in the scientific community — a study published in The Guardian, says about one in every 400 sets of fraternal twins has different fathers.

Simon and Graeme Berney-Edwards, a gay married couple, from London, England both wanted to be the biological father of their first child.

"We couldn't decide on who would be the biological father," Simon told The Daily Mail. "Graeme said it should be me, but I said that he had just as much right as I did."

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Most of us are our own worst critics. We bully ourselves when we fall short of perfection, carry around past regrets, and refuse to let ourselves off the hook for any transgressions.

Unless this cycle is stopped, it can lead to persistent self-inflicted suffering. Studies show that those who have a hard time forgiving themselves are more likely to experience heart attacks, high blood pressure, depression, and addiction.

Fred Luskin, PhD, director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Project, told Prevention there are four things that are hardest for people to forgive themselves for:

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