Heroes

If you look at her hands, you'll see her struggles. Literally.

Who knew a bucket of water could be so hard? They do.

If you look at her hands, you'll see her struggles. Literally.
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Stella Artois

Aissa lives in Sahel, a region south of the Sahara Desert, in Niger.

Sahel is notorious for its lack of water.


Near Torombi Village, where Aissa lives, there is a very deep well.


That's where the village women get their water by hauling it up in buckets.

Pulling up buckets of water is harder work than you'd imagine.

Just ask the women about their hands.

"When you get used to drawing water, you don't feel the pain any more. The first time you draw water, the skin pulls off and your hands bleed, but you continue to draw water." — Aissa

But worse than having bleeding and blistering hands? Falling into the well, which is exactly what happened to Aissa — and her daughter.

Aissa yelled for others to come save her daughter:

"Just save my child! I know that I will surely die. Let my child go back home and may God bless her."

Ultimately, they were OK.

But the danger that comes just from trying to get water remains.

Watch below to see Aissa tell her story, as well as the story of another village, Sourountouna, that has found a way to battle the scarcity.

While the campaign the video refers to began in September 2014, the message is still HUGELY relevant. There are still so many people who risk their lives just to get drinking water.

When we hear about racial bias in education, we might picture things like disparities in school funding, disciplinary measures, or educational outcomes. But it can also show up in the seemingly simplest of school assignments—ones that some of us wouldn't even notice if we don't look outside our own cultural lens.

Ericka Bullock-Jones shared one such instance on Facebook, with her daughter's responses to questions on a high school ancestry assignment.

"My kids go to a pretty much all white school," she wrote. "They got an assignment yesterday asking them to talk to their relatives and document how their families came to 'immigrate' to the US. The teacher asked for details about the 'push and pull of the decision' and really made it sound like a light hearted assignment. Female Offspring was INCENSED. She is a beast - and I mean that in the best possible way. I wish I had a scintilla if [sic] her nerve, knowledge and courage when I was her age. This is what she put together to turn in for this assignment..."

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Parents, teachers, and students have had to dig deep into their creativity and flexibility as back-to-school time hits, pandemic-style. From Zoom classes to hybrid models to plexiglass desk barriers, school simply does not—and cannot—look normal in 2020.

I've seen many parents fret over how and where their kids will do their online schooling. Do they need a desk? What about a quiet space? What if we don't have separate rooms for each kid? And those are just the worries about space.

With everyone's concern levels being sky high, it's no wonder the reactions to one dad's school-at-home setup were mixed. A Reddit user shared this video to the r/nextfuckinglevel subreddit, and while we don't know who the dad is, his classroom building skills truly are next level.

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Crest

Some of the moments that make us smile the most have come from everyday superstars, like The McClure twins!

Everyone could use a little morning motivation, so Crest – the #1 Toothpaste Brand in America – is teaming up with some popular digital all-stars to share their smile-worthy, positivity-filled (virtual) pep talks for this year's back-to-school season!

As part of this campaign, Crest is donating toothpaste to Feeding America to unleash even more smiles for families who need it the most.

Let's encourage confident smiles this back-to-school season. Check out the McClure Twins back-to-school pep talk above!

Most of us had one of those neighbors growing up—the one who gave us the stink eye if we so much as looked at their perfectly mowed lawn and shooed us away if even our shadows crept onto their flower beds. There's a reason "Get off my lawn!" was a meme before memes were even a thing.

Then there are neighbors who rock. The ones who smile and wave through the window and share their fresh-baked cookies with the neighborhood kids. The folks who genuinely enjoy the vibrant energy that children bring to the block and embrace the idea of "it takes a village."

When one of the guys behind Canyon Chasers, a motorcycle enthusiast website, shared a video of how he handled a kid who kept playing in his driveway when he wasn't home, it wasn't clear at first which kind of neighbor he was going to be. But then he explains how his security footage showed a preschooler riding his bike around his flat concrete driveway every evening, and how he decided to do something about it.

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via wap rem x / Twitter

As society has become more accepting of LGBTQ people, the average age people come out of the closet has dropped significantly, from 37 among those in their 60s to 21 for those in their 30s.

However, many people, especially those who are older, are never able to come out because of societal or familial pressures.

An adorable new video that went viral on TikTok shows it's never too late to be your true self. A woman named Aimee was having a conversation with her grandmother — who she assumed was straight — when she admitted to being attracted to women.

Aimee thought it was so important that she had to capture the conversation on video.

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