Imagine you're 9, have a smartphone, and see your friend's pics from a party you weren't invited to.

This eye-opening TEDx talk may be a real aha moment for a lot of people raising kids.

Making sure your kid won't send naughty pictures or be mean to others on their smartphone is just as easy (HAHA) as making sure they don't drink underage or engage in risky sex-stuff. Frequent conversations and judgment-free real talk are the key.


And so is empathy.

"EMPATHY IS THE APP."

That's where Dr. Devorah Heitner believes it all begins.

Parents exercising empathy by getting in their children's shoes is the first step to help both groups navigate the big, scary world of technology.

But how? That's the million-dollar question.

Dr. Heitner suggests that parents try to understand all the technological experiences that kids are confronted with on a daily basis — not just the scary ones:

"What must it feel like to be 9 years old and watch all of your friends online be invited to a party that you weren't invited to? How does it feel for a 10-year-old to watch their parents constantly attached to a phone or email responding to work requests? What is it like as a 12-year-old to feel the pressure of needing to be constantly available and responding to text messages all the time?"
— Dr. Devorah Heitner

These are the interactions that shape your child's life and relationship with technology. And these are the feelings that parents can and should talk to their kids about when they're young.

But here's the part that Dr. Heitner doesn't address:

It can be really hard to connect with kids about how social media and technology usage make them feel if a parent isn't acquainted with technology themselves. And if this is how a majority of kids are communicating, is it fair to make your child the odd one out because it's hard for adults to keep up? Of course not!

The best way to put yourself in their shoes is to put yourself in their apps.

Here are some helpful rules and tips (and yes, they require some empathy on the part of your child too!):

If there's a kid in your life who is on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, or other forums, consider passing this along to their parents!

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Crest

Some of the moments that make us smile the most have come from everyday superstars, like The McClure twins!

Everyone could use a little morning motivation, so Crest – the #1 Toothpaste Brand in America – is teaming up with some popular digital all-stars to share their smile-worthy, positivity-filled (virtual) pep talks for this year's back-to-school season!

As part of this campaign, Crest is donating toothpaste to Feeding America to unleash even more smiles for families who need it the most.

Let's encourage confident smiles this back-to-school season. Check out the McClure Twins back-to-school pep talk above!

Photo by Charl Folscher on Unsplash

Harvard historian Donald Yacovone didn't set out to write the book he's writing. His plan was to write about the legacy of the antislavery movement and the rise of the Civil Rights era, but as he delved into his research, he ran into something that changed the focus of his book completely: Old school history textbooks.

Now the working title of his book is: "Teaching White Supremacy: The Textbook Battle Over Race in American History."

The first book that caught his attention was an 1832 textbook written Noah Webster—as in Merriam-Webster's Dictionary—called "History of the United States." Yacovone, a 2013 recipient of Harvard's W.E.B. Du Bois medal—the university's highest award for African American studies—told the Harvard Gazette about his discovery:

"In Webster's book there was next to nothing about the institution of slavery, despite the fact that it was a central American institution. There were no African Americans ever mentioned. When Webster wrote about Africans, it was extremely derogatory, which was shocking because those comments were in a textbook. What I realized from his book, and from the subsequent ones, was how they defined 'American' as white and only as white. Anything that was less than an Anglo Saxon was not a true American. The further along I got in this process, the more intensely this sentiment came out. I realized that I was looking at, there's no other word for it, white supremacy. I came across one textbook that declared on its first page, 'This is the White Man's History.' At that point, you had to be a dunce not to see what these books were teaching."

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As part of its promise for a brighter world, Dole is partnering with Bye Bye Plastic Bags's efforts to bring sunshine to all.

Visit www.sunshineforall.com to learn more.

When I opened Twitter Saturday morning, I saw "Chris Evans" and "Captain America" trending. Evans is my favorite of the Marvel Chrises, so naturally I clicked to see what was happening with him—then quickly became confused. I saw people talking about "nude leaks," some remarks about (ahem) "size," and something about how he'd accidentally leaked naked photos of himself. But as I scrolled through the feed (not looking for the pics, just trying to figure out what happened) the only photos I saw were of him and his dog, occasionally sprinkled with handsome photos of him fully clothed.

Here's what had happened. Evans apparently had shared a video in his Instagram stories that somehow ended with an image of his camera roll. Among the tiled photos was a picture of a penis. No idea if it was his and really don't care. Clearly, it wasn't intentional and it appears the IG story was quickly taken down.

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via Philanthropy Daily

On September 14, Charles "Chuck" Feeney signed the paperwork to shut down Atlantic Philanthropies. The ceremony was attended via Zoom by the philanthropies' board which included former California Governor Jerry Brown, Bill Gates, and Nancy Pelosi.

While most would think the shuttering of a philanthropic endeavor would be a sad event, it was just how Feeney planned. It marked the competition of four-decade mission to give away almost every penny of his $8 billion fortune.

Feeney has saved $2 million to live on for the remainder of his life.

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