The oddly cathartic 'Keep Going Song' will make you alternate between laughing and crying

2020 has definitely, for sure, without a doubt, been the strangest year we as a society have collectively lived through. And it's not even close. Remember when we all thought 2016 was a doozy? How adorable were we then?

We've all worked on ways to cope through the upheaval of a global pandemic, the intensity of social unrest, the chaos of political insanity, and the uncertainty of what comes next. Some of us are dealing with the loss of loved ones, unemployment and financial stress, helping our kids navigate virtual schooling, and the mental health toll all of this is taking.

Considering all of that, most of us can use all the help we can get in the coping department.

Perhaps that's why the "Keep Going Song" from The Bengsons—a husband-wife musical duo—is resonating with so many people. The song, which they says is "meant as a gesture of love, a try, a fail, a blessing, way to be gentle," is quirky, funny, alternatingly silly and profound, and overall just thoroughly delightful. In between the catchy "Keep going on song" choruses, Abigail Bengson speaks and sings a seemingly spontaneous narrative while Shaun Bengson plays a simple guitar riff in the background, and it all works in a weird and wonderful way.


In the beginning it seems like it's just going to be a goofy song as Abigail describes how they ended up living with Shaun's parents' house with their 3-year-old, but when she suddenly shifts into describing the universal truths of what we're all going through, there comes this unexpected emotional unveiling effect. Maybe it's the compassion in the lyrics or the sincerity in her unique voice. Maybe it's when she asks, "Are you okay? Are you alright? Are you okay? Are you alright?" or when she sings, "I hope you have enough good company or enough good memory to last you a long time," but it's hard not to feel understood and comforted by her.

The Keep Going Song (title track) www.youtube.com


By the time you get to the end, you feel almost like you've just had a heartwarming call with an old friend. And it's clear from the more than 2200 comments on Facebook that people found something in the song that hit a soft spot in people around the world.

"Thank you so much. I sent this to all my expat friends here in France and we all felt cared for. You are the proof that there are beautiful beautiful people all over the world...love," wrote one commenter.

Another wrote, "This is beautiful and raw and true and inspiring and so so healing and currently rippling around my little universe of Irish family and friends who are rippling it even further. Word."

Others added their gratitude as well:

"Somehow you seem to know my heart in both its joy and its sorrow. Thank you for sharing your prayers of hope and positivity. I will carry them with me tomorrow as I mourn my sister on her birthday."

"Thank you so much for this song. It's the first work of art that has come out from this time that resonates so deeply. Can't help but cry every time I play it (and it's been a whole lot). And sharing. We need this blessing so much. May it bring many good things to you."

"I'll just echo what everyone else is saying here - this is what I hadn't realized I needed since "the shit hit." I felt like I was being hugged by an old friend the entire time I listened. Thank you. All the love to you and your family."

"You have moved me and all the friends and family with whom I've shared this to tears. You went straight to the heart of this moment, fully inhabited all the feelings, and beautifully reached out to hold and be held by us all. This is a powerful gift that we didn't quite appreciate how much we needed until we received it. May you feel a little less alone, too. Thank you for making this Monday morning feel more possible to face now."

Some commenters asked if the couple had a Venmo or Cashapp or something where they could donate a little to say thank you, and The Bensons responded with this:

"Oh this is so kind! Thank you so much! We have the album for sale on iTunes and Apple Music and the money from that would wind its way to us. Or you could send those dollars to your favorite initiative! Here's one doing amazing (non-partisan) work for helping disenfranchised voters, Reclaim Our Vote: bit.ly/rov2020donate"

So yeah, they're as good a people as they seem in their video.

Thank you, Bengsons, for sharing your joy and rage and grief with us in a way that we all feel heard and understood.

True

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday are teaming up to find the people who lead with love everyday.

Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

Nomination ends November 22, 2020

File:TIFF 2019 kristen stewart (48701274962).jpg - Wikimedia Commons

Of the 25 actors that have been nominated for an Oscar for playing an LGBTQ character, a grand total of zero of them have been openly queer. The debate on whether or not only gay actors can play gay roles has many sides and nuances. After Darren Criss, who is straight, won an Emmy for playing Andrew Cunanan in The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story, Criss vowed he would never play another gay man because he didn't want to be "another straight boy taking a gay man's role." Actor Ben Whishaw, who is gay, feels otherwise. "I really believe that actors can embody and portray anything, and we shouldn't be defined only by what we are," Whishaw said. Recently, Kristen Stewart also weighed in on some of the complexities around the issue.

Variety recently asked Stewart about the importance of gay actors playing gay characters. Stewart acknowledged the complexity of the issue. "I would never want to tell a story that really should be told by somebody who's lived that experience. Having said that, it's a slippery slope conversation because that means I could never play another straight character if I'm going to hold everyone to the letter of this particular law. I think it's such a gray area," Stewart told Variety.

Keep Reading Show less
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
via Richard Desmick / TikTok

Over the weekend, an estimated thousands of people ran 2.23 miles to show their support for Ahmaud Arbery, a former high school football player and avid jogger. Arbery was shot and killed in February near Brunswick, Georgia after being pursued in a truck by a former policeman and his son who claimed he resembled someone responsible for break-ins in the neighborhood.

Keep Reading Show less
Sarita Linda Rocco / Facebook

Americans are more interested in politics than ever these days. More voted in the 2020 election than in any other in the past 100 years. Over 65% of the voting-eligible cast a ballot in the contentious fight between Joe Biden and Donald Trump.

"People are very excited and paying attention even though there are all this bad news and high 'wrong track' numbers in the country," Nancy Zdunkewicz, managing editor at Democracy Corps, told The Hill.

It's wonderful to see that a greater number of Americans are standing up to be counted and demanding their voices be heard. But it's also the symptom of a deep level of discontent many people feel about their country.

Keep Reading Show less