Kristen Stewart asks Jesse Eisenberg insulting questions to prove a point about sexism in the media.

Imagine you can ask Kristen Stewart ANY question you want. Ready? Go!

Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty Images.


Here are some reasonable choices:

  1. What's your favorite role you've ever played?
  2. What was it like working with Jodie Foster on "Panic Room" and who are the actresses you look up to the most?
  3. Which script was funnier, "Adventureland" or "Breaking Dawn — Part 2"?

Sadly, all entertainment reporters seem to care about is:

  1. Who are you dating?
  2. No, but seriously, who are you dating?
  3. C'mon, tell us who you're dating!

A person can only take so many questions about Robert Pattinson, am I right?

But this is just the way it is for most actresses. While Stewart's male costars get insightful interview questions about career and craft, women are forced to talk about their latest hairstyle and walk the "manicure runway" — yep, that's a real thing.

But! In a new skit from Funny or Die, Kristen Stewart gets a little revenge by turning these sexist interview questions on Jesse Eisenberg, her costar in "American Ultra."

In the hilarious video, Jesse and Kristen sit down to interview each other, only to find out they've been given each other's question cards.


All GIFs via Funny or Die.

Things get interesting when Kristen starts asking Jesse all kinds of inane questions usually reserved for, well, her.

"Levi's," Eisenberg says. But "I don't know if that's a person."

Stewart moves on to the next question, a classic:

Eisenberg, shockingly, is not with child.

And, of course, no interview of a Hollywood actress would be complete without at least one mention of breasts:

Finally, Eisenberg's had enough.

"I just feel like a lot of the questions you're asking me feel like they're ... not about the movie," he says.

Exactly!

There's a difference between trying to humanize an actress and reducing her to the most basic of female stereotypes.

Sticking only to questions about the movie or her career could probably get a little boring, but how about we show a little creativity and insight? How about we go a little deeper than what dress she's wearing or whether she feels like her biological clock is ticking?

Or, at the very least, how about we start subjecting men to the same kinds of vapid interviews women have endured for so long?

If this video with Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg is any indication, this kind of red carpet equality is long overdue:

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.