Look at the photos and videos of thousands of youth demanding climate change action NOW.

Watch out, world. The kids have shown up—and they are not here for our b.s. excuses.

Last year, 15-year-old Greta Thunberg sat on the steps of Swedish parliament, alone, to protest inaction on climate change. Today, at 16, she is leading hundreds of thousands of youth—and adult supporters—in a global school strike, filling the streets of cities and towns around the world for the same purpose.  

Her singular act of protest has turned into a massive movement of young people who are fed up with politicians and leaders playing Russian roulette with their future. On Friday, March 15, students are leaving school to tell governments that young people want immediate and meaningful action on the global climate crisis.


Thunberg and others have already sat on the steps of parliament buildings every Friday in a #FridaysforFuture movement, trying to urge governments to urgently enact policies that will help stave off accelerated global warming.

Today, that movement took a dramatic leap forward.

You have to see the hundreds of thousands of young people showing up at these rallies to believe it.

As of Friday morning, school strikes and rallies were taking place in more than 2000 locations in 123 countries. Check out these photos and videos pouring in from around the globe:

Several thousand people in New York City, U.S., with more on the way.

10,000+ people demonstrated in Copenhagen, Denmark.

At least 5,000 marched in Helsinki, Finland.

In Milan, Italy, people showed up by the tens of thousands—and even more attended rallies in 200 other locations in Italy alone.

Dublin, Ireland—again, numbers in the thousands.

25,000 students filled the streets of Berlin, Germany.

Are we getting the picture yet? Everyone who said that kids would just be skipping school to skip school were dead wrong.

The idea that kids don't really care about this or aren't educated enough about climate change to know what they're protesting is absurd. Kids learn about science and government in school. Scientists around the globe have made it clear that we have to get rising global temperatures under control or face dire consequences to life on our planet, while governments play political and economic games as they always do.

Kids don't care about such games. They want to inherit a healthy, habitable planet—and they're willing to fight for it.

Like these kids in Cape Town, South Africa:

And in Barcelona, Spain:

Check out the Maori Haka at the school strike at Nelson College, New Zealand.

Maori Haka at the school strike at Nelson College, NZ.Tens, maybe hundreds of thousands students in New Zealand, Australia and East Asia. They are setting the standard high!Latest global update say:2052 places in 123 countries on all continents, including Antarctica. So, the question is:What will you do on March 15 2019? #schoolstrike4climate #FridaysForFuture #climatestrike #WhateverItTakes

Posted by Greta Thunberg on Friday, March 15, 2019

Are you tearing up yet? There's more:

Check out Hong Kong:

And Delhi, India:

And Ottawa, Canada:

And Lisbon, Portugal:

And Madrid, Spain:

This isn't a cute little demonstration; it's a global phenomenon. And it was all started by one teenager who refused to accept leaders' excuses for lack of action on climate change.

Kudos to Greta, for starting such an inspiring worldwide movement. Get out of the way, grown-ups. The youth have arrived to save us all.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.