'Marriage: A Story of Love in 28 Parts' has long-time couples rolling

As someone who's been married to the same human for 22 years, I can say with confidence that a big key to marital bliss is to come at it with a sense of humor. Living with and loving someone for life (hopefully) is a shared journey with ups and downs and unexpected detours. The story of that journey is filled with big life events and mundane daily details, and with moments both precious and perturbing.

If you've been married a while, this collection of funny tweets about marriage will hit home. Shared by Joshua Johnson on Facebook, this "Marriage: A Story of Love in 28 Parts" compilation includes universal sentiments, classic spouse conundrums, and pandemic-specific realities for people in long-term love

Here they are, linked to the original tweets so you can follow the creators if you wish, and written out in text for our friends with audio aids. Grab your partner and have a good chuckle at your own expense:



"DATING: can't wait to see you again

MARRIAGE: part of your knee was on my side of the bed again last night"

@TheCatWhisprer

(BTW, you also pulled the covers off me every time you rolled over. Thanks for that. Love you.)

"Marrying someone is easy. Staying married after going to IKEA on a Saturday with an empty stomach, is not." @maryfairybobrry

(Have done this. Can attest it's a mistake.)

"My wife and I play this fun game during quarantine, it's called "Why Are You Doing It That Way?" and there are no winners" –@ericspiegelman

(Pandemic togetherness is so fun, isn't it?)

"Before marrying someone, listen long and hard to the sounds of their chewing because that's the soundtrack to the rest of your life." @LizerReal

(This is legit advice, young people.)

"There are two kinds of people. The ones that pack six days before a trip, and the ones that wake up day-of and realize they need to do a load of laundry. And they marry each other." @dadmann_walking

(And the early packer spends six days panicked over the last-minute packer not being packed. Ain't love grand?)

"Marriage is having separate tubes of toothpaste because your spouse squeezes it wrong" @mom_tho

(Always from the bottom, rolling as you go. This is the way.)

"I told my husband I wanted to buy an expensive blender, he said we don't need an expensive blender. Long story short, how long should I wait before I tell him it arrives tomorrow?" @3sunzzz

(Pssst. Don't tell him at all. He might not even notice.)

"Wife: You're doing it wrong.

Me: What?

Wife: *motions vaguely in the direction of my entire life*"

@XplodingUnicorn

(Ouch.)

"My wife said she'd buy her own birthday cake this is a test right" @DadBroDad1

(Yes. Yes it is.)

"Listen: I just found out that my husband eats spaghetti with a spoon so I can't listen to your problems right now." –@thearibradford

(This is just psychopathic behavior, honestly.)

"In 34 years on this planet I've learned one very important lesson that I'm going to pass on to you fellas. She can eat your fries. You cannot eat her fries." –@CrockettForReal

(It's funny because it's true.)

"-commercial break-
Husband: *silent*
-fight scene-
Husband: *completely and utterly silent*
-quiet dialogue scene-
Husband: so let me tell you about the history of rockets"

–@Megatronic13

(SHUSSSHHHH.)

"Me:

My wife:

Me:

Wife:

Me:

Wife:

Me:

Wife:

Me: (stands up)

Wife: While you're up...."

–@simoncholland

(This one hits a little too close to home. I LIKE SITTING, OKAY?)

"My wife and I are both working from home.

She microwaved fish.

Time to alert HR."

- @Xploding Unicorn

(Or a divorce lawyer. Honestly, woman.)

"Me, giving my husband's eulogy: It's so hard

Husband, from coffin: ᵀʰᵃᵗ'ˢ ʷʰᵃᵗ ˢʰᵉ ˢᵃᶦᵈ."

–@mommajessiec

(Even when he's stiff. That's what she said.)

"I miss how my wife would say "he's a rescue" whenever I misbehaved at parties." –@SladeWentworth

(The pandemic has ruined everything.)

"This needs to be over soon because my husband is starting to realize I'm not out of his league." @RachelNoise

(Seriously. COVID ruins every darn thing.)

"MIL: You have to teach them really young to pick up after themselves

Me: *watching my husband take off his socks and leave them in the middle of the living room*"

–@mom_ontherocks

(Ahem. Thanks for the advice, "mom.")

"I have a cold and it's pretty bad but my wife has a husband with a cold and apparently that's way worse." –@simoncholland

(I believe the Latin term for this is spousus patheticus.)

"[my husband has the man flu. After 3 days]:

M: will you please just take medicine??
H: *pouts* fine, what flavor is it??
M: what flav...it's ADULT FLAVORED!"

@jaxwax04

(Case in point.)

"Welcome to marriage. Here's the new way you fold towels." @HenpeckedHal

(And you're pretty much guaranteed to never do it quite right, so don't bother trying.)

"Made it to that level of marriage where you get in trouble for being able to fall asleep so fast." @simoncholland

(Oh, but wait until you find out what you did to piss her off in her dream...)

"My husband: We were way over on groceries last month.
Me: How did THAT happen?
Him: Well we spent like $100 on ice cream sandwiches...
Me: ...
Him: ...babe, that's bad.
Me: I HATE THIS PLACE IT SUCKS HERE"

@thearibradford

(Seriously. I'm a grownup, I do what I want.)

"My wife managed to open a jar of pickles herself and I am now nonessential." thedadvocate01

(It's okay. If you keep on taking out the garbage that she could take out herself, she'll probably keep you around.)

"Husband, "I'm going to the store, do you need anything?"

Me, "A bottle of champagne."

Husband, "Oh, I got you one yesterday.

"Me, "I said what I said.""

@Parkerlawyer

(And I meant what I meant.)

"My wife asked me if she had any 'annoying' habits and then got all offended during the power point presentation." @BattyMclain

(Hey now. Two can play at this game, buddy.)

"Husband: Does it bother you when I —

Me: Yes."

@mommajessiec

(Ouch again.)

"Wife: Are you just going to walk around all day without a shirt on?

Me: Just giving you a show.

Wife: Can I change the channel?"

XplodingUnicorn

(And they lived happily ever after.)

If I've learned anything in two decades of marriage, it's that there are few things a good belly laugh together can't fix. Here's to taking care of one another and finding the humor in marital bliss.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

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