People love this misshapen Cincinnati Christmas tree because it's so 2020
via Chris Demmler / Twitter

Photos of the 65-foot Norway spruce set up in Cincinnati's Fountain Square on Saturday morning are going viral because it perfectly represents how 2020 is going for a lot of Americans.

The misshapen tree's large patches and missing limbs made it look like a gigantic version of the pathetic tree from "A Charlie Brown Christmas."

The tree was seen by many as a metaphor for a long year that's left us all frazzled, frayed, and more than a little off-balance.








The tree inspired a T-shirt that's sure to be a collector's item one day.


Looks like it's been a hard week for the city.



All the attention inspired the tree to speak up for itself.






However, after news of the tree spread 'round the globe, Fountain Square officials stepped in to share some much-needed good news.

"2020 has been a rough year for all of us, including our tree. Our team is hard at work making this 65' Norway Spruce beautiful for the holiday season," they wrote on Facebook. "Stay tuned for transformation photos as we get her fluffed up and beautified after her long drive into town."

Evidently, the tree's decrepit appearance was due to the fact the team that usually puts it into shape was smaller than usual due to the pandemic. The team of eight to ten people has been reduced to two this year.

"Basically, at some point in the process every year, the tree looks a lot like this," said Emily Stowe, 3CDC senior event marketing manager.

"The tree makes an overnight trip from northern Ohio down to the Square. The tree is tied up from top to bottom for transport, with each branch wrapped up for safety as well as to keep the tree from being damaged. After the tree arrives it's lifted with a crane and put in place," she said, according to FOX19.

"The branches will be shifted and moved into place to give us the end look everyone is used to," Stowe said.

After a few days, the team slowly untied all of the branches and it blossomed into a beautiful, full, and very green Christmas tree.

If the tree was a metaphor for how 2020 was going for most people, its glorious transformation gives us all a glimmer of hope for 2021. After all, there's a COVID-19 vaccine on the way and the country's new leadership looks determined to help put America back on the right track.

Christmas is going to be a little different for everyone this year. But none of that matters as long as we remember the true meaning of the holiday.


Linus ... The True Meaning of Christmas www.youtube.com

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Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday are teaming up to find the people who lead with love everyday.

Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

Nomination ends November 22, 2020

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