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Read Amy Schumer's excellent response to a racist joke she made a few years ago.

Amy Schumer isn't afraid to admit she's far from perfect.

Read Amy Schumer's excellent response to a racist joke she made a few years ago.

Sometimes, awful things are said by good people. Just ask comedian Amy Schumer.

Those who stand on stage to entertain a crowd often face a decision: Make a hurtful comment for a laugh or don't make a hurtful comment for a laugh.

At least once (OK, more than once), Schumer chose the former.



Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Peabody Awards.

The 34-year-old once told a joke that went like this: "I used to date Hispanic guys, but now I prefer consensual."

Surprise! Not everyone finds that funny.

The comment — made in one of Schumer's older stand-up routines — recently resurfaced amidst her skyrocketing fame. Media outlets like The Guardian and The Week pointed it out to readers alongside a handful of other culturally insensitive one-liners she's cracked throughout the years.

As Monica Heisey wrote in June: "For such a keen observer of social norms and an effective satirist of the ways gender is complicated by them, Schumer has a shockingly large blind spot around race."

We love you, Amy. But Heisey makes an excellent point.

Whenever a comedian's joke comes under fire, the hope is they'll work to right their wrong.

The comedy world constantly treads a thin line between humorous and harmful — especially when it comes to race. As is the case with Schumer, comedians often cross that line with material targeting marginalized groups to which they don't belong.

While Schumer's comedy has been on point lately with her feminist sketches and her fantastic speech about self-empowerment, her jokes about non-white people hadn't quite evolved along with the rest of her material.


GIF from "Parks and Recreation."

Most of the time, acknowledgment of wrongdoing — accompanied with a sincere apology — is all we're asking for!

But comedians sometimes choose the ol' "It's not our fault you were offended!" route. (Yeah, we're looking at you, Dane Cook and Patton Oswalt.)

Unfortunately, Schumer was headed in the wrong direction last week (ugh).

She took to Twitter to defend herself: "I will joke about things you like and I will joke about things you aren't comfortable with. ... That includes making dumb jokes involving race."


GIF from VH1.

But! In another tweet posted on July 6, she seemed to have benefited from a little self-reflection.

When a person on Twitter confronted Schumer about the joke that negatively stereotyped Hispanic men, she did what we were hoping she would do in the first place. She assured her fans that she's a work in progress, and she's learning from her mistakes. And ... wait for it ... she even apologized!


Did you hear that, everyone?! "I am evolving as any artist. I am taking responsibility and hope I haven't hurt anyone."

It's difficult to work past the defensiveness you might feel after others call you out on your missteps. But learning from your mistakes is important.

Thank you for admitting you were wrong, Amy. Can't wait to see you how you continue to evolve.


GIF from "Inside Amy Schumer."

Anne Owens and Luke Redito / Wikimedia Commons
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When Madeline Swegle was a little girl growing up in Burke, VA, she loved watching the Blue Angels zip through the sky. Her family went to see the display every time it was in town, and it was her parents' encouragement to pursue her dreams that led her to the U.S. Naval Academy in 2017.

Before beginning the intense three-year training required to become a tactical air (TACAIR) pilot, Swegle had never been in an aircraft before; piloting was simply something she was interested in. It turns out she's got a gift for it—and not only is she skilled, she finds the "exhilaration to be unmatched."

"I'm excited to have this opportunity to work harder and fly high performance jet aircraft in the fleet," Swegle said in a statement released by the Navy. "It would've been nice to see someone who looked like me in this role; I never intended to be the first. I hope it's encouraging to other people."

As Swegle's story shows, representation and equality matter. And the responsibility to advance equality for all people - especially Black Americans facing racism - falls on individuals, organizations, businesses, and governmental leadership. This clear need for equality is why P&G established the Take On Race Fund to fight for justice, advance economic opportunity, enable greater access to education and health care, and make our communities more equitable. The funds raised go directly into organizations like NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, YWCA Stand Against Racism and the United Negro College Fund, helping to level the playing field.

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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

Laurel, Mississippi is home to a little over 18,000 people, more than 61% of whom are Black. On Tuesday, the town's mayor, Johnny Magee, issued a historic executive order to remove the state's flag from the City of Laurel government properties—a moment that moved him to tears.

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Trump has waged an unrelenting assault on our values and our history as a nation of immigrants.

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