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Right after announcing he was taking a pay cut to raise employees' salaries, business is booming.

Here's a story to show your boss. When it comes to taking care of his employees, Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price is going above and beyond (and business has never been better).

Right after announcing he was taking a pay cut to raise employees' salaries, business is booming.

You might have heard a story from a few weeks ago about a CEO named Dan Price and his plan to raise the starting salary for his employees to $70,000 per year.

He told his employees about the change at Gravity Payments, his credit card processing company, during their quarterly staff meeting.


Needless to say, they were pretty excited about the news, giving him a standing ovation.

CBS News interviewed 29-year-old equipment supervisor Jose Garcia about the change. He said that he cried when he told his mom about the raise.

Before the announcement, Garcia's salary was $33,000 per year. The raise was a huge deal to him and others at the company.

Over the next two years, salaries will increase periodically.

Effective immediately, everyone in the company will make at least $50,000 (or, if they already make more than $50,000, they'll get a $5,000-per-year raise). From there, all employees will be bumped to $60,000 next year, and $70,000 the year after.

How is Price doing this? To start, he took a huge pay cut.

He had been making $1 million per year. But now? He'll take home just $70,000 per year.

Price was motivated to change the salary structure after reading a 2010 study that suggested people have the highest emotional well-being at $75,000.

Would raising the salary of someone like Jose Garcia from $33,000 to $70,000 have a tremendous impact on his happiness? Likely! Is it the same for someone already making well over $75,000 per year? According to this study, no.

Business has never been better.

Price tells CNN Money that in the 11 years he's been running Gravity Payments, he's never seen a better week for new business after bringing in dozens of new clients.

"In the short-term, [news reports about the pay] could help demand for our services, but clients won't stay with a company that's not providing a superior value."
— Dan Price

Morale is high, and applications are flying in faster than ever before.

It turns out that offering people a living wage with competitive benefits makes people want to work for you. Who knew?

They've received about 3,500 job applications for the company's two open positions (a sales representative and a support staffer), which is around 10 times as many as they're used to.

He's putting people before profits.

Based on that study, he realized that making less than ideal wages is emotionally taxing on a person. So if he's in a position to help make the world a better place for the people around him, why wouldn't he?

He cut the company's immediate profit projections in half, but he seems pretty happy with how that's working out so far.

After all, there's a reason Price was named 2014's "Entrepreneur of the Year" by Entrepreneur Magazine.

And it probably has to do with making gutsy decisions like this (and possibly looking ridiculously good in a blazer).

Check out the CBS News report about Price:

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.