More

She was sold as a sex slave for $73. Then she was sold again. And finally, she was rescued.

Her story — in her own words. TRIGGER WARNING: Rape and sexual assault.

She was sold as a sex slave for $73. Then she was sold again. And finally, she was rescued.

"In your whole life, the happiest moment is to feel free from the darkness..."


There is nothing greater than being free.

Remy, a survivor who was sold into sex slavery at 12 years old, knows this firsthand. She was rescued and taken to an organization called Love146 that helps women and children who are survivors of sex slavery.



Love146 has chronicled her powerful story in the video at the end.

But here's Remy's story in her own words:

"I was only 12 years old when I was first sold for sex.

When I was small we lived in the city. Our home was always chaotic. It was a place where people fought and quarreled.

My father didn't care about us. He was always in jail and he wasn't there to protect us. ... There were hurtful things my mother would say to me. She would say that I was just like my father — worthless and useless. I believed her. I believed I was useless.

There was one incident with my uncle that happened that I will never forget. I wanted to run during that time. I was scared because he had a knife with him. He raped me... I decided to run away. I thought I might find love and care someplace else. I would find importance I didn't receive from my family...

The sex club paid the trafficker $73. For me that was my worth.

I was 12 years old when the trafficker sold me. I was introduced to the other call girls. While on duty we would be sold for sex.

I felt no hope at all. I felt like a bird trapped inside a cage. I felt like I was inside a cage and no one could help me.

The bird is sad. Even if it wants freedom, it cannot escape. It is still sad and suffering. He has no hope. The bird will think his life will end there. Just like me.

I hoped for a simple life. A comfortable life and a good family. When I looked in the mirror, I saw a person who was dirty, someone who was uneducated and not respectable.

There was trouble in the club. The trafficker said we would go to the port and board a ship. We arrived at Cebu City the next day. The police were there and they got us.

We were rescued but I didn't know we were being helped until later.

Then we were bought to Love146. ... In the past, I felt forsaken because I was raped and I was dirty. I was sold and lots of people used me.

I thought God didn't care about me. Now, I feel so important to Him. Whatever is broken in me, God has found the people to complete me again.

Now, I am free just like a bird given its freedom. I can do anything because God has set me free."

You can listen to Remy tell her story.

And that story has a happy ending.

Remy was rescued in 2009 and sent to live in Love146's Round Home, where she received counseling and other services so that she can have a meaningful life.

The nonprofit has four survivor care homes in the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Philippines, where they offer the same support that Remy received to many other survivors who were once bought and sold.

When someone is removed or escapes from the sex trade, they need help, and organizations like Love146 provide that. You can learn more about them and even make a donation if you're so inclined by visiting their website.

When we hear about sex trafficking, there's often a feeling of helplessness that comes with the knowledge. But in addition to spreading awareness, we can support organizations that are rehabilitating survivors. Maybe give this a share?

True
Frito-Lay

Did you know one in five families are unable to provide everyday essentials and food for their children? This summer was also the hungriest on record with one in four children not knowing where their next meal will come from – an increase from one in seven children prior to the pandemic. The effects of COVID-19 continue to be felt around the country and many people struggle to secure basic needs. Unemployment is at an all-time high and an alarming number of families face food insecurity, not only from the increased financial burdens but also because many students and families rely on schools for school meal programs and other daily essentials.

This school year is unlike any other. Frito-Lay knew the critical need to ensure children have enough food and resources to succeed. The company quickly pivoted to expand its partnership with Feed the Children, a leading nonprofit focused on alleviating childhood hunger, to create the "Building the Future Together" program to provide shelf-stable food to supplement more than a quarter-million meals and distribute 500,000 pantry staples, school supplies, snacks, books, hand sanitizer, and personal care items to schools in underserved communities.

Keep Reading Show less
via Tom Ward / Instagram

Artist Tom Ward has used his incredible illustration techniques to give us some new perspective on modern life through popular Disney characters. "Disney characters are so iconic that I thought transporting them to our modern world could help us see it through new eyes," he told The Metro.

Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

In Ward's "Alt Disney" series, Prince Charming and Pinocchio have fallen victim to smart phone addiction. Ariel is living in a polluted ocean, and Simba and Baloo have been abused by humans.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less
via Facebook

Pride Month events were cancelled in Minot, North Dakota last June due to the COVID-19 pandemic. So, the city decided to temporarily fly a Pride flag in support of the LGBTQ community at city hall earlier this month.

The flag ceremony was accompanied by the town's mayor, Shaun Sipma, proclaiming June as Pride Month in the city. This gesture ruffled a lot of feathers in Minot, a city of around 41,000 residents.

Spima said his decision to support the flag-raising stemmed from seeing "a population within our community that does need to have that issue addressed – the issue of hate. When they came to me, they had stated that they wanted a call for kindness, not necessarily acceptance but a call for kindness. And that I can appreciate."

Keep Reading Show less

Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

Keep Reading Show less