She 'went high' instead of going low after overhearing a table of homophobes.

Natalie Woods was eating a restaurant in Addison, Texas, last week, when she overheard some really upsetting language coming from a table nearby.

A fellow diner mentioned how "disgusted" they were by the fact that their "liberal" nephew is gay. One of their family members chimed in, noting they'd need to pray for him to be "cured," The Huffington Post reported.

Their words hit close to home for Woods. She knows the pain of family rejection all too well.


"I was fuming with anger, but then became really sad," she explained in an email. "I know what [it's like] to have family members alienate you, or shame you. I felt for this kid, and have been in his shoes."

Photo courtesy of Natalie Woods, used with permission.

Instead of lashing out with anger — or not saying anything at all — Woods decided to go high, even as the other diners were going low.

Inspired by Michelle Obama's speech at the Democratic National Convention this past summer, Woods focused on turning the situation into a positive one.

How could she "act like the Jesus [she] grew up learning about," and respond in a way that might motivate this family to think twice about how they view their LGBTQ loved one?

She pulled out her wallet and asked the restaurant if she could cover the other table's tab. She left before seeing the family's reaction, but made sure to scribble a message on the receipt to make her point crystal clear:

Photo courtesy of Natalie Woods, used with permission.

Her note read: "Happy Holidays, from the very gay, very liberal table sitting next to you. Jesus made me this way. ... P.S. be accepting of your family."

Woods posted a photo of the receipt online, and it took off, racking up more than 1,000 Likes and over 130 shares on Facebook by Nov. 17, 2016.

"I'm a 60 year old straight, white guy," wrote one commenter. "And I totally support what you did. Thanks for making our world a little better."

"Your gesture brought me to tears," wrote another. "Thank you. You are such a beautiful person."

Woods almost didn't share the receipt online. But knowing how divided the country is after the election, she hoped one small gesture might have a bigger impact.

"I thought about not posting anything, but realized it was important for people after this election to see an act of love, rather than a complaint from the other side of a keyboard," she wrote.

Photo by Ringo Chiu/AFP/Getty Images.

"I don't think I did anything magnificent or over the top," she wrote. "I did what I think people should be doing all of the time for anyone. I mean that — anyone."

If you're feeling discouraged and helpless after the outcome of the election, Woods has a message for you: "Get involved."

"There are organizations, nonprofits, and ways to volunteer all over every community," she urges. "Small acts of love really matter, but sometimes love looks like protesting, running for local office, marching with minorities, and defending the people around you."

True

In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

Who would have thought that giving the world access to all human knowledge via the internet, the ability to follow and hear from experts on any subject via social media, and the ability to see what's happening anywhere in the world via smartphones with cameras would result in a terrifying percentage of the population believing and spouting nothing but falsehoods day in and day out?

Those of us who value facts, reason, and rational thought have found ourselves at some of our fellow citizens and thinking, "Really? THIS is how you choose to use the greatest tool humanity has ever created? To spew unfounded conspiracy theories?"

It's a marvel, truly.

Between Coronavirus/Bill Gates/5G conspiracies and QAnon/Evil Cabal/Pedophile conspiracies, I thought we were pretty much full up on kooky for 2020. But apparently not. The massive fires up and down the West Coast have ignited even more conspiracy theories, some of which local law enforcement and even the FBI have had to debunk.

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True

In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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On September 14, Charles "Chuck" Feeney signed the paperwork to shut down Atlantic Philanthropies. The ceremony was attended via Zoom by the philanthropies' board which included former California Governor Jerry Brown, Bill Gates, and Nancy Pelosi.

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I certainly don't thank you for your lengthy essay last month where you describe the abuse you have suffered (for which you have my sympathy) and in which you stated that you do not hate trans people, while at the same time peddling even more anti-trans mis-information. Sadly, your diatribe directly caused some trans children to self-harm and other to attempt suicide.

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