Hiker shares viral video of a territorial cougar mom following him for 6 unforgettable minutes
via Kyle Burgess / Instagram

Kyle Burgess, 26, recorded a terrifying, six-minute encounter with a cougar (aka mountain lion, puma) on Saturday at Slate Canyon near Provo, Utah. The video shows the cat methodically following Burgess, eventually pouncing at him with her massive claws while hissing.

Burgess was on a ten-mile run through the canyon when he came across some wild kittens. But he soon noticed that they were wild mountain lion cubs and their mother wasn't very happy about him being around.


"I didn't really know what kind of cubs they were or what animal they were," Burgess told Fox 13. "Once I did realize what they were, I was like, that's mom right there. I'm screwed."

The mother then lunged out at Burgess and, in an attempt to save her cubs, followed him until she felt they were safe.


Cougar Attack in Utah | Mountain Lion Stalks Me For 6 Minutes! www.youtube.com


In the video, Burgess yells at the cat attempt to scare her. "No! No! I'm big and scary! Go away! "Burgess yelled as she followed him down the path.

At about thee minutes in, the cat lunges and hisses at Burgess with its claws out. He screamed right back at the cat, making sure he never turned his back on her. At the end of the video, Burgess throws a rock at the cat and it quickly scurries away.

"Holy cow. Yeah, not going back that way," a relieved Burgess said at the end of the encounter.

People can't imagine living through such a scary situation. "I think I had a heart attack watching. My heart was racing so fast. I can't imagine this happening to me in real life," Brenda Raffin said on Facebook.

Others are criticizing those who say the cougar was stalking Burgess. "The selected headlines are fear-mongering junk 'a cougar stalked a man for 6 minutes...' No. 'A cougar pushed back a perceived threat to her babies for 6 minutes,'" Blair Brown wrote.

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources praised Burgess for correctly handling the potentially deadly situation.

"He backed away. He didn't go toward the mountain lion or her kittens," Scott Root, DWR conservation outreach manager, said according to Fox News. "He stayed large, he stayed loud and he backed away from the area for quite a while. I think he did everything really well."

The video is going viral because it's thrilling and scary. It's also a great opportunity to create awareness about how to handle a cougar encounter in the world.

Here's what to do, according to Wild Aware Utah:

IF YOU ENCOUNTER A COUGAR

1. Stop. Never run from a cougar. Do not approach the cougar.

2. Maintain eye contact.

3. Pick up children and pets or keep them very close.

4. Stand up tall.

5. Do not crouch or squat.

6. Make yourself look bigger by raising and waving your arms or jacket above your head.

7. Talk firmly in a loud voice, back away slowly and leave the area.

8. Fight back if you are attacked! Protect your head and neck.

9. If you are aggressive enough the cougar will probably flee.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.