Since he first ran for the presidency, Donald Trump has been on a mission to destroy the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. Whether he attacks the plan that made health insurance available to more than 20 million Americans because he genuinely understands it and doesn't like it or because it's something that Obama did is unclear, but either way, getting rid of it has been on his agenda for four years.

(Now might be a good time to remind people that the bones of the Affordable Care Act were built by Republican Mitt Romney, whose Massachusetts healthcare reform during his time as Governor served as a model for Obamacare.)

Trump's promises to take down Obamacare have been accompanied by promises to replace it with something better. After all, if you take away a healthcare law that protects people with pre-existing conditions and makes health insurance available to millions who couldn't afford it, you have to put something in its place or you literally put people's lives at risk.

The president appears to know this, because he keeps saying he's got a healthcare plan coming. The best healthcare. The most tremendous healthcare. Fantastic. Terrific. A big, beautiful plan the likes of which the world has never seen before. And it's coming soon. Very soon. So very soon. Within two weeks, he's said several different times, many months apart.

Biden pointed out at last night's debate that Trump has no plan for healthcare, and Trump again repeated what he's been saying since at least January 2017. The Lincoln Project compiled these claims in one video, and even though we've heard them before, it's striking to see almost four years of promises condensed into a minute and fifteen seconds.


Keep Reading Show less
Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
True

When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

Keep Reading Show less