The 7 most terrifying things about the Trumpcare bill that could pass today.

The American Health Care Act could pass the House today — and people are scared.

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images.

With the addition of a last-minute amendment, Republican leaders are confident just enough moderate Republicans are on board to push the bill through to the Senate.


Despite the ostensibly moderating changes, the bill remains as potentially destructive as before.

As a result, thousands of citizens are hurriedly telling their representatives in no uncertain terms that they'll be voted out of a job if they pass it.

Here's why they're not waiting:

1. The Congressional Budget Office hasn't scored the current version of the bill, so we don't know how many people will lose coverage or how much it will cost.

A running congressman works to pass a bill very few people have even seen. Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images.

When the CBO scored the old draft of the bill that was tabled back in March, it found that, under its provisions, up to 24 million people could lose insurance coverage by 2026. The new version of the bill has been amended several times, but the score hasn't been reissued yet.

The updated law could cover more people. It could cover fewer. It could be less expensive. It could be more expensive. The problem is — nobody knows.

The House still plans to vote on it.

That's terrifying.

2. If you have any number of common pre-existing conditions, the bill could massively spike your premiums.

Despite Republican assurances that the proposed law "protects" people with pre-existing conditions, a recent amendment allows states to choose which health benefits they require insurers to cover — meaning maternity, mental health care, and more could be out depending on where you live — and to permit insurance companies to charge based on health status rather than age.

A Center for American Progress analysis concluded that this amendment would raise premiums by thousands — and in some case tens of thousands — of dollars for individuals with asthma, pregnancy, autism, kidney disease, cancer, and more.

3. Rape and sexual assault could be considered pre-existing conditions under the new law.

Prior to the ACA, insurers were largely free to deny health coverage to those who had suffered sexual violence.

Under the new law, insurance companies in some states could charge survivors much more than they're currently paying.

That's shockingly cruel.

4. Lifetime limits could make a comeback.

Before Obamacare, insurance companies could cap the amount they agreed to pay out over a customer's lifetime, forcing even insured people with expensive medical conditions to go deep into debt or go without care.

Allowing states to apply for waivers for essential health benefits could mean that insurance companies start setting those limits again, which would be devastating for people with chronic, lifelong illnesses.

5. The bill could cut funding for special education programs.

As if the heretofore illustrated level of cartoon villainy wasn't enough, the bill's giant Medicaid cuts would probably spell the end of many school services for disabled children who rely on that funding.

Clearly on a roll, the bill's architects figured they might as well throw in gutting care for poor, sick old people too while they're at it.

6. It could even mess with the health coverage you get through your employer, like most Americans do.

If you work for a big company with a presence in many states, your boss could choose to set up shop in the one with the skimpiest essential benefits standards, saving the company some money and gutting your coverage in the process.

That could mean you lose your mental health care, your mammograms, your vaccinations, or even your prescription drug coverage.

7. It could cause massive, unknown damage to the U.S. economy.

Over 12 million Americans work in health care. It's our country's fourth largest industry by GDP. No one knows for sure what impact the bill might have on all those jobs and all that market value because the bill has yet to be released publicly in its final form.

And the House seems like it's just going to roll the dice with it.

The vote is dangerously close.

Representatives leaning no as of now seem to include Mario Diaz-Balart, David Joyce, and Michael Turner.

Still undecided representatives presently may include Justin Amash, Paul Cook, Carlos Curbelo, John Faso, Darrell Issa, Steve Knight, Erik Paulsen, Bruce Poliquin, Peter Roskam, Ed Royce, Elisa Stefanik, Rob Wittman, Kevin Yoder, and Don Young.

If any of these people represent you, and this bill freaks you out, do yourself and your fellow Americans a favor, light up their phones this morning.

Emotionally, spiritually, and — perhaps most crucially — physically, we might all feel a lot better if this thing goes down.

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

True

In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

It sounds like a ridiculous, sensationalist headline, but it's real. In Cheshire County, New Hampshire, a transsexual, anarchist Satanist has won the GOP nomination for county sheriff. Aria DiMezzo, who refers to herself as a "She-Male" and whose campaign motto was "F*** the Police," ran as a Republican in the primary. Though she ran unopposed on the ballot, according to Fox News, she anticipated that she would lose to a write-in candidate. Instead, 4,211 voters filled in the bubble next to her name, making her the official Republican candidate for county sheriff.

DiMezzo is clear about why she ran—to show how "clueless the average voter is" and to prove that "the system is utterly and hopelessly broken"—stances that her win only serves to reinforce.

In a blog post published on Friday, DiMezzo explained how she had never tried to hide who she was and that anyone could have looked her up to see what she was about, in addition to pointing out that those who are angry with her have no one to blame but themselves:

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Courtesy of Back on My Feet
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Having graduated in the top 10% of Reserve Officer Training Corp (ROTC) cadets nationwide in 2012, Pat Robinson was ready to take on a career in the Air Force full speed ahead.

Despite her stellar performance in the classroom and training grounds, Robinson feared other habits she'd picked up at Ohio University had sent her down the wrong tracks.

First stationed near Panama City, Florida, Robinson became reliant on alcohol while serving as an air battle manager student. After barnstorming through Atlanta's nightclubs on New Year's Eve, Robinson failed a drug test and lied to her commanding officer about the results.

Eleven months later, she was dismissed. Feeling ashamed and directionless, Robinson briefly returned home to Cleveland before venturing west to look for work in San Francisco.

After a brief stint working at a paint store, Robinson found herself without a source of income and was relegated to living in her car. Robinson's garbage can soon became littered with parking tickets and her car was towed. Golden Gate Park's cool grass soon replaced her bed.

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