The website BrettKavanaugh.com is now a powerful resource  for sexual assault survivors.
BrettKavanaugh.com

America may be stuck with Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court but one group is brilliantly using his name to support sexual assault survivors.

If you type in the url BrettKavanaugh.com you will be directed to a site full of resources, information and links produced to assist assault survivors. A message on the site reads:

The start of Brett Kavanaugh’s tenure on the Supreme Court may look like a victory for one interest group or another.

But, more importantly, it is putting a national focus on the issue of sexual assault – and how we as a country can and should do more to prevent it and to support those who have experienced it.

This past month, thousands of survivors came forward to tell their stories. We applaud your bravery. We believe you. And if you are seeking additional resources, these groups can offer assistance.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.


The site was launched by a non-partisan legal group called Fix the Court. T

he group’s director Gabe Roth said he had purchased the url years before Kavanaugh was nominated to the Court. After his confirmation hearing turned into one of the most controversial, and disappointing, moments in American political history, he went to work. In a statement, Roth:

“Three years ago, I bought a handful of URLs that I thought might be useful in any forthcoming Supreme Court confirmation battles. Included were BrettKavanaugh.com, .org and .net. Today I am redirecting those three to a landing page with resources for victims of sexual assault. I believe Dr. Ford. I believe Prof. [Anita] Hill. I also believe that asking for forgiveness is a sign of maturity and strength, not weakness.”
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