These moms are flaunting their stunning postpartum bodies on Instagram.

Meg Boggs is on a body confidence mission to change the way we look at postpartum bodies.

As part of her mission, the mom blogger recently recruited 25 moms to share their own journeys and struggles with body confidence, postpartum depression and anxiety as well as infant loss and grief. She had them share photos and details about their story, using the hashtag #this_is_postpartum on Instagram. The collection of images is stunning to say the least.


Every woman’s story is inspiring in its own unique way.

One mother, Ashley Dorough, of houseofdorough.com, posted about the postpartum depression she suffered from after the birth of her second child. “Hey, you. I know what it feels like to look in the mirror and feel disgusted, worthless, broken.”

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#this_is_postpartum Hey, you. I know what it feels like to look in the mirror and feel disgusted, worthless, broken. To cry for no reason. To feel too proud to ask for help. To have unexplainable feelings of hopelessness, anger, and resentment. To have all of your expectations of what you think motherhood is going to be like ripped apart. All of these experiences we go through... they DO make us stronger. But why doesn’t it feel that way? Why isn’t it celebrated? Why can’t we glamorize ALL body types and all seasons of life? What is this insane pressure we feel to make everything perfect? I grew up with no one in the media who looked like me, in a society where no one talks openly about depression and anxiety. Today, I’m sharing this for the teenage girl who punishes herself with diets and exercise because she doesn’t look like what she sees on TV. Today, I share this for the mama who is putting so much pressure on herself to “snap back” to her pre-baby weight. I’m sharing this for the plus size women, mamas and mama’s to be who have always been greatly underrepresented in the media. And for the person who thinks they might need help but is afraid to admit it... this is for you. I’ve been you, and I’m here to tell you it’s okay. I’m sharing this for YOU, no matter your gender, size, shape, or race. The good, the bad, the ugly... this is us. This is about finding the beauty in everything around you, your children, your life, and the journey. Getting the help you need even if you don’t think you do. I’m here for you. We’re all here for you. You. Are. Enough. This is postpartum, and so is this: @sidelinesocialite

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“To cry for no reason. To feel too proud to ask for help. To have unexplainable feelings of hopelessness, anger, and resentment. To have all of your expectations of what you think motherhood is going to be like ripped apart. All of these experiences we go through... they DO make us stronger. But why doesn’t it feel that way? Why isn’t it celebrated?”

Desiree Fortin, who struggled with infertility, chose to use the platform as a method to embrace her postpartum body after welcoming triplets,” she told CNN. "My body changed more than I anticipated. There was a lot of extra skin, there were stretch marks covering all over.” She now refers to them as her “hope wounds” as they represent things she had “prayed and longed for.”

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Incase you don’t know, here are some Fun Facts about my Pregnancy/Delivery: • 1. I made it to our goal date: 34 weeks + 1 Day 2. I was obsessed with @fiveguys hamburgers my entire pregnancy and now I can’t stand the thought of eating there. 3. I was on strict bed rest for two months and binge watched @greysabc 4. I measured 52 weeks pregnant 5. Our gender reveal video went viral. We told all our loved ones we were having twins and surprises them with the 3rd baby at the reveal🙌🏻💕 6. The birth order: Charlize, Sawyer, and Jax 7. I had a c-section and there was about 20 people in my room. Each baby and myself had a team of doctors and nurses. 8. I had a mole removed from my ass after the c-section 🙈🤦🏻‍♀️😂😳 yep, really fun fact for ya🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️😂 9. (More of a fact than fun fact😭) I hemorrhaged after my c-section when I was in recovery with my mom. I had blood transfusions and almost died. My doctor saved my life💕 10. I didn’t get to meet the babies until a full day after their birth. 11. I was obsessed with the diabetic hospital jello 😂 12. The triplets were in the NICU for 2 weeks. 13. Charlize was the first baby I held. 14. My doctor told me that I likely wouldn’t be able to breastfeed because of my birth complications, but I produced enough milk for the triplets plus! 15. I’m taking over @super_pregnant007 today to share my heart and journey to Motherhood!! Head over to @super_pregnant007 to follow along!! • AND Comment below ⬇️⬇️⬇️ with a fun fact about your pregnancy or delivery 💕

A post shared by Desiree Fortin (@theperfectmom) on

"They are the road map to my motherhood. They are a representation of my three miracle babies who I would not have if I did not walk through infertility and carry three human beings at one time.”

Other stories document miscarriage, and the shame and feelings of failure that women can struggle with after c-section scarring and general body image struggles. Each is distinctive, beautiful and truly moving.

Boggs’ personal struggles with motherhood inspired her to start the movement.

Her body confidence struggles began during pregnancy, when Boggs, a plus size woman, noticed that her body didn’t look like other expectant moms. "I would see pictures of a perfect bump and I didn't relate to that because I definitely did not have a perfect bump," she told CNN. Despite internet searches, she had trouble finding images of women who looked like her. "I felt as if my postpartum journey and body didn't count."

After she had her baby girl, she refused to be photographed with her daughter. "I regret so much that I wasn't in the photos with her. It's so important and you have to think about your kids and they are going to want you in the photos with them," she told CNN.

At seven months postpartum, she was inspired to start her blog, MegBoggs.com. While she expected to be shamed and trolled by readers, she was pleasantly surprised with all the support she received. "To my surprise, my messages flooded with positivity and things like 'I needed this today.' That's when this idea started finding its way into my heart," she explained.

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Being thin is okay. Not being thin is okay. Having curves is okay. Not having curves is okay. Having stretch marks is okay. Not having stretch marks is okay. Having scars is okay. Not having scars is okay. Having cellulite is okay. Not having cellulite is okay. It’s not your job to look like what you see on the big screen, or in the media. It’s not your job to look perfect. Or put together. Or effortlessly happy. It’s not your job to look like anyone or anything else but YOU. And it’s OKAY. But do you know what’s never okay? Shaming another for not fitting the mold of a societal “perfection”. Shaming another for their body type. Or the clothes that they wear (or don’t wear). Or the marks left on their body during different walks of life. So here’s to measuring ourselves in smiles and feelings of contentment rather than inches and pounds. And here’s to friends that see you for all the loveliness that you are. 💗 you @th3littlestavenger

A post shared by Meg Boggs (@meg.boggs) on

Boggs and these 25 brave and beautiful women hope that their message will help normalize the postpartum experience for others who may feel alone.

"I can get hundreds of negative comments but it's that one message that I'll get, even if it's just the one that says 'This is what I needed to see today,' it's those messages that remind me that it's worth it," Boggs said.

This new campaign is a great reminder for women to celebrate their personal journey into motherhood, no matter what it looks like. Bringing a life into this world is one of the most beautiful gifts, and the bodies that help do it should be treated with nothing but love and respect no matter what.

Courtesy of Macy's

Brantley and his snowman

True

"Would you like to build a snowman?" If you asked five-year-old Brantley from Texas this question, the answer would be a resounding "Yes!" While it may sound like a simple dream, since Texas doesn't usually see much snow, it seemed like a lofty one for him, even more so because Brantley has a congenital heart disease.

On Dec. 11, 2019, however, the real Macy's Santa and his two elves teamed up with Make-A-Wish to surprise Brantley and his family on his way to Colorado where there was plenty of snow for him to build his very own snowman, fulfilling his wish as part of the Macy's Believe campaign. After a joy-filled plane ride where every passenger got gift bags from Macy's, the family arrived in Breckenridge, Colorado where Santa and his elves helped Brantley build a snowman.

Brantley, Brantley's mom, and Santa marveling at their snowmanAll photos courtesy of Macy's

Brantley, who according to his mom had never actually seen snow, was blown away by the experience.

"Well, I had to build a snowman because snowmen are my favorite," Brantley said in an interview with Summit Daily. "All of it was my favorite part."

This is just one example of the more than 330,000 wishes the nonprofit Make-A-Wish have fulfilled to bring joy to children fighting critical illnesses since its founding 40 years ago. Even though many of the children that Make-A-Wish grants wishes for manage or overcome their illnesses, they often face months, if not years of doctor's visits, hospital stays and uncomfortable treatments. The nonprofit helps these children and their families replace fear with confidence, sadness with joy and anxiety with hope.

It's hardly an outlandish notion — research shows that a wish come true can help increase these children's resiliency and improve their quality of life. Brantley is a prime example.

"This couldn't have come at a better time because we see all the hardships that we went through last year," Brantley's mom Brandi told Summit Daily.

Brantley playing with snowballs

Now more than ever, kids with critical illnesses need hope. Since they're particularly vulnerable to disease, they and their families have had to isolate even more during the pandemic and avoid the people they love most and many of the activities that recharge them. That's why Make-A-Wish is doing everything it can to fulfill wishes in spite of the unprecedented obstacles.

That's where you come in. Macy's has raised over $132 million for Make-A-Wish, and helped grant more than 15,500 wishes since their partnership began in 2003, but they couldn't have done that without the support of everyday people. The crux of that support comes from Macy's Believe Campaign — the longstanding holiday fundraising effort where for every letter to Santa that's written online at Macys.com or dropped off safely at the red Believe mailbox at their stores, Macy's will donate $1 to Make-A-Wish, up to $1 million. New this year, National Believe Day will be expanded to National Believe Week and will provide customers the opportunity to double their donations ($2 per letter, up to an additional $1 million) for a full week from Sunday, Nov. 29 through Saturday, Dec. 5.

There are more ways to support Make-A-Wish besides letter-writing too. If you purchase a $4 Believe bracelet, $2 of each bracelet will be donated to Make-A-Wish through Dec. 31. And for families who are all about the holiday PJs, on Giving Tuesday (Dec. 1), 20 percent of the purchase price of select family pajamas will benefit Make-A-Wish.

Elizabeth living out her wish of being a fashion designer

Additionally, this year's campaign features 6-year-old Elizabeth, a Make-A-Wish child diagnosed with leukemia, whose wish to design a dress recently came true. Thanks to the style experts at Macy's Fashion Office and I.N.C. International Concepts, only at Macy's, Elizabeth had the opportunity to design a colorful floral maxi dress. Elizabeth's exclusive design is now available online at Macys.com and in select Macy's stores. In the spirit of giving back this holiday season, 20 percent of the purchase price of Elizabeth's dress (through Dec. 31) will benefit Make-A-Wish.You can also donate directly to Make-A-Wish via Macy's website.

This holiday season may be a tough one this year, but you can bring joy to children fighting critical illnesses by delivering hope for their wishes to come true.

Usually when we share a story of a couple having been married for nearly five decades, it's a sweet story of lasting love. Usually when we share a story of a long-time married couple dying within minutes of each other, it's a touching story of not wanting to part from one another at the end of their lives.

The story of Patricia and Leslie "LD" McWaters dying together might have both of those elements, but it is also tragic because they died of a preventable disease in a pandemic that hasn't been handled well. The Michigan couple, who had been married for 47 years, both died of COVID-19 complications on November 24th. Since they died less than a minute apart, their deaths were recorded with the exact same time—4:23pm.

Patricia, who was 78 at her passing, had made her career as a nurse. LD, who would have turned 76 next month, had been a truck driver. Patricia was "no nonsense" while LD was "fun-loving," and the couple did almost everything together, according to their joint obituary.

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Courtesy of Macy's

Brantley and his snowman

True

"Would you like to build a snowman?" If you asked five-year-old Brantley from Texas this question, the answer would be a resounding "Yes!" While it may sound like a simple dream, since Texas doesn't usually see much snow, it seemed like a lofty one for him, even more so because Brantley has a congenital heart disease.

On Dec. 11, 2019, however, the real Macy's Santa and his two elves teamed up with Make-A-Wish to surprise Brantley and his family on his way to Colorado where there was plenty of snow for him to build his very own snowman, fulfilling his wish as part of the Macy's Believe campaign. After a joy-filled plane ride where every passenger got gift bags from Macy's, the family arrived in Breckenridge, Colorado where Santa and his elves helped Brantley build a snowman.

Brantley, Brantley's mom, and Santa marveling at their snowmanAll photos courtesy of Macy's

Brantley, who according to his mom had never actually seen snow, was blown away by the experience.

"Well, I had to build a snowman because snowmen are my favorite," Brantley said in an interview with Summit Daily. "All of it was my favorite part."

This is just one example of the more than 330,000 wishes the nonprofit Make-A-Wish have fulfilled to bring joy to children fighting critical illnesses since its founding 40 years ago. Even though many of the children that Make-A-Wish grants wishes for manage or overcome their illnesses, they often face months, if not years of doctor's visits, hospital stays and uncomfortable treatments. The nonprofit helps these children and their families replace fear with confidence, sadness with joy and anxiety with hope.

It's hardly an outlandish notion — research shows that a wish come true can help increase these children's resiliency and improve their quality of life. Brantley is a prime example.

"This couldn't have come at a better time because we see all the hardships that we went through last year," Brantley's mom Brandi told Summit Daily.

Brantley playing with snowballs

Now more than ever, kids with critical illnesses need hope. Since they're particularly vulnerable to disease, they and their families have had to isolate even more during the pandemic and avoid the people they love most and many of the activities that recharge them. That's why Make-A-Wish is doing everything it can to fulfill wishes in spite of the unprecedented obstacles.

That's where you come in. Macy's has raised over $132 million for Make-A-Wish, and helped grant more than 15,500 wishes since their partnership began in 2003, but they couldn't have done that without the support of everyday people. The crux of that support comes from Macy's Believe Campaign — the longstanding holiday fundraising effort where for every letter to Santa that's written online at Macys.com or dropped off safely at the red Believe mailbox at their stores, Macy's will donate $1 to Make-A-Wish, up to $1 million. New this year, National Believe Day will be expanded to National Believe Week and will provide customers the opportunity to double their donations ($2 per letter, up to an additional $1 million) for a full week from Sunday, Nov. 29 through Saturday, Dec. 5.

There are more ways to support Make-A-Wish besides letter-writing too. If you purchase a $4 Believe bracelet, $2 of each bracelet will be donated to Make-A-Wish through Dec. 31. And for families who are all about the holiday PJs, on Giving Tuesday (Dec. 1), 20 percent of the purchase price of select family pajamas will benefit Make-A-Wish.

Elizabeth living out her wish of being a fashion designer

Additionally, this year's campaign features 6-year-old Elizabeth, a Make-A-Wish child diagnosed with leukemia, whose wish to design a dress recently came true. Thanks to the style experts at Macy's Fashion Office and I.N.C. International Concepts, only at Macy's, Elizabeth had the opportunity to design a colorful floral maxi dress. Elizabeth's exclusive design is now available online at Macys.com and in select Macy's stores. In the spirit of giving back this holiday season, 20 percent of the purchase price of Elizabeth's dress (through Dec. 31) will benefit Make-A-Wish.You can also donate directly to Make-A-Wish via Macy's website.

This holiday season may be a tough one this year, but you can bring joy to children fighting critical illnesses by delivering hope for their wishes to come true.

via Twins Trust / Twitter

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Simon and Graeme Berney-Edwards, a gay married couple, from London, England both wanted to be the biological father of their first child.

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via Elliot Page / Instagram

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