These photos from around the world should scare the pants off of McDonald's and Walmart.

Low-wage workers all across America are walking off the job today to protest for a $15-per-hour minimum wage and a union.

"What?" You might be saying to yourself. "Why does the 16-year-old grimacing at me from behind the counter at Wendy's while she texts her boyfriend selfies of her new temporary tattoo deserve to make that much money?"


(OK, Stephanie. OK.)

Because contrary to popular belief, most minimum- and low-wage workers aren't teenagers working a first job. And most aren't fast-food workers either.

(Although, hey! Teenagers working a first job deserve to be paid respectfully too, no matter how sullen and emo they are.)

They're health care workers like this:


And professors like this:


And retail workers like this:


Moms. Dads. Cooks. Cashiers. Teachers. Students.

And not only are they out on the streets, shouting their lungs out for their right to be paid like human beings, they have support from all over the world.

I'm talking far-away places, people.

Places like Hamburg, Germany, where they're encouraging their American colleagues to keep up the fight.

São Paulo, Brazil, where they're staging die-ins in the street, despite intervention from military police.



Finland (What up, Finland!), where in addition to showing solidarity, they're also protesting exploitative contracts.



Bangladesh, where garment workers are still struggling to unionize a year after a horrific building collapse left over 1,000 people dead.


Tokyo, where for over a year they've been demanding a 1,500-yen wage (about $12.60) to make living in one of the most expensive cities in the world actually somewhat livable.


And Auckland, New Zealand, where many fast-food workers work on "zero-hour" contracts that force them to make themselves available to work but give them no guaranteed hours.

So yeah. This thing is getting real. Really, really real.

The Fight for $15 movement has already had some major success. $15 minimum wage ordinances were passed in Seattle and San Francisco last year, and other cities across America might follow suit soon.

But the pressure needs to stay on for that to actually happen!

If you believe all workers should be treated with dignity and respect — and paid accordingly — then please share and spread the word!

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Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
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