They were injured in the line of duty. Now these veterans are going for gold.

The second Invictus Games began in Orlando, Florida, on Sunday, May 8.

Founded by Prince Harry, the biennial event brings together active duty and veteran military service members with visible and invisible injuries to compete in 10 different sports.

The games debuted in London in 2014, and this year, more than 500 athletes from 15 different countries, along with thousands of fans and family members converged in Orlando at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex for the five-day event.


Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for Invictus.

Check out these 18 incredible images from Orlando as the Invictus Games get underway.

1. The opening ceremonies were a beautiful celebration of courage and competition.


Photo by Tim Rooke/Getty Images.

2. There were presentations from the U.S. military, including the U.S. Silent Drill Platoon, which performs exercises in absolute silence to showcase the discipline and professionalism of the Marine Corps.

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for Invictus.

3. Invictus Games founder and veteran Prince Harry spoke to the crowd of athletes, families, and fans.

"I'm a long way from London tonight..." the prince said, "...but when I look out, I see so many familiar faces, servicemen and women, their friends and their families, and all of the people who got them here. I feel like I'm at home."

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for Invictus.

4. All 15 teams entered the arena to a roaring crowd.

And just like the Olympics, there are matching uniforms, flags, and fanfare for the occasion.

The team from the Netherlands enters the arena. Photo by Gregg Newton/AFP/Getty Images.

5. That's because in addition to veteran-athletes, the complex was filled with families, friends, and fans.

Will Reynolds, captain of the American Invictus Team, was joined by his wife and daughters.

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for Invictus.

6. But soon it was time to compete. Check out this fierce competitor's Wonder Woman prosthetic at a sitting volleyball match.

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for Invictus.

7. There was plenty of excitement in the air as Team USA entered the Field House to compete in the rowing finals.

Photo by Alex Menendez/ Getty Images for Invictus Games.

8. To allow the athletes to compete at their highest level, there are adaptations and modifications to some of the events and equipment.

Powerlifter Christine Gauthier of Canada uses a wheelchair for mobility, but while she competes, she is secured to the weight bench.

Photo by Scott Iskowitz/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

8. Cyclists prepare to speed down the course on hand bikes.

Photo by Gerardo Mora/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

9. Archer Martin Clapton from the United Kingdom holds the arrow in his teeth while aiming at the target.

Photo by Gerardo Mora/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

10. And these competitors put it all on the line during the indoor rowing finals.

Photo by Alex Menendez/ Getty Images for Invictus Games.

11. Family members and fans from around the world have converged on Orlando to celebrate their favorite heroes.

Photo by Gerardo Mora/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

12. Even if they only get a glimpse of the competitors before they dash off.

Photo by Alex Menendez/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

13. There are 10 competitive events at the games, including sitting volleyball, indoor rowing, powerlifting, road cycling, track and field, swimming, wheelchair basketball, wheelchair rugby, and wheelchair tennis.

Photo by Scott Iskowitz/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

14. Each event requires some serious strength, along with hours of practice, dedication, and skill...

Photo by Gerardo Mora/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

15. ...things these veterans and active duty service members have no shortage of.

Photo by Alex Menendez/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

16. For every point, win, or goal, the fans go wild!

Photo by Gerardo Mora/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

17. Because at the end of the day, this is bigger than a sporting event.

Adaptive sports provide numerous benefits for veterans with disabilities, including decreased stress, increased independence, a reduced dependence on pain and depression medications, and even higher achievement in employment and education.

Photo by Alex Menendez/Getty Images for Invictus Games.

18. It's a celebration of teamwork, fortitude, and second chances.

Invictus is Latin for "unconquered," and these athletes are just that.

The games are only a few days long, but the impact they have on the competitors, families, and fans lasts much longer.

Nerys Pearce of Team Great Britain is presented with a silver medal in the powerlifting event by President George W. Bush, honorary chairman of the Invictus Games in Orlando. Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for Invictus.

Events like these are a reminder of the resilience these veterans and their families possess.

Coming back from war with injuries and illnesses isn't easy, but opportunities to compete for and represent their home nations can be a light in the shadow of recovery for these athletes and their brothers and sisters in arms.

Photo by Alex Menendez/ Getty Images for Invictus Games.


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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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