This clever tool could help you cope when panic attacks strike.

I have struggled with anxiety since high school.

As I've learned recently, it can get really bad sometimes — especially due to my post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety triggers.

Lately, my anxiety has resulted in panic attacks in social settings and insomnia at nights brought on by a fear of nightmares.


That's why I've taken to carrying around a mental health crisis kit.

It's always good to be prepared, and in my case, that means being equipped with the tools I need to prevent an oncoming attack or help treat one that's already happening.

My crisis kit includes:

  • Aromatherapy diffuser pens
  • Eucalyptus oil
  • Fidget cube and tangle
  • Earplugs
  • Mascara and eyebrow pencil (in case I start picking at my hair)
  • Tissues
  • Tums (because sometimes anxiety gives me stomach problems)
  • Chapstick (so I don’t pick at my dry skin)
  • Eyedrops
  • Tylenol or tension-headache Excedrin
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Hard candy (so I don’t bite my nails)
  • Poetry book, journal, bullet journal (which has crisis plans in it)

That seems like a lot, right?

But it's not — I fit most of my items in a small pencil pouch, so it rarely takes up room. I am a student, and all of the items easily fit in my backpack.

It’s important to know this is what works for me.

When I am having a panic attack or am triggered, it is important to have my eyedrops and tissues for when I start crying and oils for when I need to ground myself.

I carry my journal because I want to log my emotions in the moment. The bullet journal, admittedly my work in progress, has my crisis plans for when I feel a panic attack. I also write poems, and sometimes certain moments help me write.

Personally, I recommend people carry mental health crisis kits, especially if you experience any anxiety or PTSD or panic attacks.

You can even make one for depression. The key is including what helps you.

I told you what I keep in mine as a suggestion, and it has really helped me through tough times. I could be sitting in class, getting all of my anxious energy pooling up and my tangle helps me. But maybe you'll include a happy photo to stave off depressive episodes or a note from a friend that reminds you to stay grounded.

Whatever helps you make it through the day — a crisis kit can help make sure you have it on hand whenever you need it.

This story originally appeared on The Mighty and is reprinted here with permission.

True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less
via Tom Ward / Instagram

Artist Tom Ward has used his incredible illustration techniques to give us some new perspective on modern life through popular Disney characters. "Disney characters are so iconic that I thought transporting them to our modern world could help us see it through new eyes," he told The Metro.

Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

In Ward's "Alt Disney" series, Prince Charming and Pinocchio have fallen victim to smart phone addiction. Ariel is living in a polluted ocean, and Simba and Baloo have been abused by humans.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

Keep Reading Show less

Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

Keep Reading Show less