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This incredible speech shows why Harvey Weinstein was the biggest loser at the Oscars.

Judd, Hayek, and Sciorra delivered a must-watch speech for the Time's Up era.

This incredible speech shows why Harvey Weinstein was the biggest loser at the Oscars.

During the first Oscars of the #MeToo/Time's Up era, three of Harvey Weinstein's accusers took the stage to deliver a speech we all needed to hear.

About a day before the ceremony, it was announced that actresses Ashley Judd, Salma Hayek, and Annabella Sciorra would appear as presenters. The women had one thing in common: They'd all spoken out about being harassed or assaulted by Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein.

As allegations against Weinstein rolled in, the three actresses each shared their stories of assault at the producer's hands. In December, The New York Times published Hayek's firsthand account of her experience with Weinstein. In October, Sciorra, best known for her Emmy-nominated role on "The Sopranos," opened up to The New Yorker about being raped and harassed by Weinstein. That same month, Judd spoke with ABC's Diane Sawyer, retelling her experience as a young actress sexually harassed by a man with the ability to destroy her career before it started.


Judd, Sciorra, and Hayek appear at the Oscars. Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

The speech they delivered didn't focus much on the actions of Weinstein specifically, but on the progress of a movement getting stronger every day.

"It’s nice to see you all again. It’s been a while," said Sciorra. "It’s an honor to be here tonight. This year, many spoke their truth and the journey ahead is long, but slowly a new path has emerged."

"The changes we are witnessing are being driven by the powerful sound of new voices, of different voices, of our voices — joining together in a mighty chorus that is finally saying time’s up," said Judd.

GIFs via The Hollywood Reporter/Twitter.

"We work together to make sure that the next 90 years empower these limitless possibilities of equality, diversity, inclusion, and intersectionality," Judd added before throwing to a montage of this year's cinematic trailblazers.

The Time's Up movement has been a huge success, raising $21 million in its first 60 days.

According to a new report from Deadline, more than 1,700 people from over 60 industries contacted the group in hopes of being able to utilize its legal defense fund for workplace harassment cases. The movement began at the beginning of 2018 as a way for Hollywood to use its influence to help victims of harassment find justice across industries.

Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino, who was also targeted by Weinstein, at the 90th Annual Academy Awards. Photo by Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images.

Watch Judd, Hayek, and Sciorra's powerful address below.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.