This man spent years doodling the things he loves about his wife.

Love is a feeling that's hard to define — so Andrew Hou found a charming way around having to define it.

The artist, who lives in Seoul, Korea, says he has never considered himself to be good with words, especially when it comes to expressing his feelings. That all became increasingly evident to him in 2010, when he was having a hard time communicating his feelings to his then-girlfriend (now wife), Kate.

So he turned to what he knew best: art.


Andrew used doodling to find just the right thing to say.

All images from Andrew Hou, used with permission.

"I was never good with words, so making silly, sappy doodles was my way to workaround the problem," Andrew told Welcometoterranova. "During work, I'd pretend to be working and create these tiny doodles and send [them] to her via the phone."

Best text message ever? Possibly.

Andrew's doodles started off as a personal project between him and Kate, but after a friend posted some of them on Twitter, he realized how much they resonated with complete strangers. He decided to share them more widely. And in 2011, HJ-Story was born.

HJ-Story, based off of Kate's initials in Korean, is a series about the little moments of life and love.

The drawings reflect his relationship with Kate, but he hopes that they bring an extra bit of happiness to the world. Five years later, he's still going strong with them.

Here are 17 drawings (out of many!) that show their story.

1. There are times they can't be together.


2. And he's really patient about it.


3. But sometimes he's not so patient.


4. He always wants her to feel safe and protected. 

  


5. She brings him to life at just the right moment...


6. ...even when she can't be there in person.


7. He appreciates their differences.

"I always try to not create an illustration just for the sake of making a regular update, but when an idea of a genuine moment or event or thought pops up, I try to draw it," Andrew says.

8. Together, he knows they can make it through the big things.


9. But it's the little ones that really get him through.


10. There are life's proud moments.


11. And the overwhelming ones.


12. And the times he says the wrong things...


13. ...and tries to make them right.


14. But at the end of the day, he always feels lucky.

"Love stuck me like lightning. 7 billion people in the world and we found each other."

15. It's easy to forget that the little things matter a lot, like that time they saw the movie "Thor."


16. Or for all the times she lets him think he can sing.


17. HJ-Story reminds us that love isn't just one feeling or moment.

Andrew says he strives for HJ-Story to act as a reminder to both himself and Kate of the little events and memories during their years together and how they should always treasure and continue to remember the little moments of love.


Love is a collection of moments that grow over time.

Lainey and baby goat Annie. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse
True

Oftentimes, the journey to our true calling is winding and unexpected. Take Lainey Morse, who went from office manager to creator of the viral trend, Goat Yoga, thanks to her natural affinity for goats and throwing parties.

Back in 2015, Lainey bought a farm in Oregon and got her first goats who she named Ansel and Adams. "Once I got them, I was obsessed," says Lainey. "It was hard to get me off the farm to go do anything else."

Right away, she noticed what a calming presence they had. "Even the way they chew their cud is relaxing to be around because it's very methodical," she says. Lainey was going through a divorce and dealing with a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis at the time, but even when things got particularly hard, the goats provided relief.

"I found it impossible to be stressed or depressed when I was with them."

She started inviting friends up to the farm for what she called "Goat Happy Hour." Soon, the word spread about Lainey's delightful, stress-relieving furry friends. At one point, she auctioned off a child's birthday party at her farm, and the mom asked if they could do yoga with the goats. And lo, the idea for goat yoga was born.

A baby goat on a yoga student. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse

Goat yoga went viral so much so that by fall of 2016, Lainey was able to quit her office manager job at a remodeling company to manage her burgeoning goat yoga business full-time. Now she has 10 locations nationwide.

Lainey handles the backend management for all of her locations, and loves that side of the business too, even though it's less goat-related. "I still have my own personal Goat Happy Hour every single day so I still get to spend a lot of time with my goats," says Lainey. "I get the best of both worlds."

Lainey with her goat Fabio. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse

Since COVID-19 hit, her locations have had to close temporarily. She hopes her yoga locations will be able to resume classes in the spring when the vaccine is more widely available. "I think people will need goat yoga more than ever before, because everyone has been through so much stress in 2020," says Lainey.

Major life changes like Lainey's can come around for any number of reasons. Even if they seem out of left field to some, it doesn't mean they're not the right moves for you. The new FOX series "Call Me Kat", which premieres Sunday, January 3rd after NFL and will continue on Thursday nights beginning January 7th, exemplifies that. The show is centered around Kat, a 39-year old single woman played by Mayim Bialik, who quit her math professor job and spent her life's savings to pursue her dreams to open a Cat Café in Louisville, Kentucky.

Jeff Harry started making similar moves when he was just 10-years-old, and kept making them throughout his life. After seeing the movie "Big,"Jeff knew he wanted to play with toys for a living, so he started writing toy companies asking for next steps. He finally got a response when he was a sophomore in high school — the company told him he needed to become a mechanical engineer first.

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Lainey and baby goat Annie. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse
True

Oftentimes, the journey to our true calling is winding and unexpected. Take Lainey Morse, who went from office manager to creator of the viral trend, Goat Yoga, thanks to her natural affinity for goats and throwing parties.

Back in 2015, Lainey bought a farm in Oregon and got her first goats who she named Ansel and Adams. "Once I got them, I was obsessed," says Lainey. "It was hard to get me off the farm to go do anything else."

Right away, she noticed what a calming presence they had. "Even the way they chew their cud is relaxing to be around because it's very methodical," she says. Lainey was going through a divorce and dealing with a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis at the time, but even when things got particularly hard, the goats provided relief.

"I found it impossible to be stressed or depressed when I was with them."

She started inviting friends up to the farm for what she called "Goat Happy Hour." Soon, the word spread about Lainey's delightful, stress-relieving furry friends. At one point, she auctioned off a child's birthday party at her farm, and the mom asked if they could do yoga with the goats. And lo, the idea for goat yoga was born.

A baby goat on a yoga student. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse

Goat yoga went viral so much so that by fall of 2016, Lainey was able to quit her office manager job at a remodeling company to manage her burgeoning goat yoga business full-time. Now she has 10 locations nationwide.

Lainey handles the backend management for all of her locations, and loves that side of the business too, even though it's less goat-related. "I still have my own personal Goat Happy Hour every single day so I still get to spend a lot of time with my goats," says Lainey. "I get the best of both worlds."

Lainey with her goat Fabio. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse

Since COVID-19 hit, her locations have had to close temporarily. She hopes her yoga locations will be able to resume classes in the spring when the vaccine is more widely available. "I think people will need goat yoga more than ever before, because everyone has been through so much stress in 2020," says Lainey.

Major life changes like Lainey's can come around for any number of reasons. Even if they seem out of left field to some, it doesn't mean they're not the right moves for you. The new FOX series "Call Me Kat", which premieres Sunday, January 3rd after NFL and will continue on Thursday nights beginning January 7th, exemplifies that. The show is centered around Kat, a 39-year old single woman played by Mayim Bialik, who quit her math professor job and spent her life's savings to pursue her dreams to open a Cat Café in Louisville, Kentucky.

Jeff Harry started making similar moves when he was just 10-years-old, and kept making them throughout his life. After seeing the movie "Big,"Jeff knew he wanted to play with toys for a living, so he started writing toy companies asking for next steps. He finally got a response when he was a sophomore in high school — the company told him he needed to become a mechanical engineer first.

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