This touching music video showcases moms of all identities for Mother's Day.

When a Houston-based band, The Suffers, wanted to show their moms some love for Mother's Day, they decided to sing to them.

In an adorable, tear-jerking music video, The Suffers brought "Mammas" to life by celebrating their own mothers — and featuring queer parenting too.

All images from "Mammas" by The Suffers, used with permission.


The heartwarming video highlights moms and their love for their kids. It focuses on the eight band members' own experiences with their moms, but kicks off with a queer couple who are featured throughout the video. All the band members fell in love with this approach.

"The family unit as we know it is evolving," says lead singer Kam Franklin. "There is no one way to be a mother. So we have this representation because it exists and lesbians can be mothers just in the same way straight moms and single parents can."

As LGBTQ parenting continues to become normalized, The Suffers' bold celebration of queer parenting is more important than ever. Roughly 6 million American children have LGBTQ parents, a number that will likely rise in coming years.

"I hope that we're evolving as a society to where people are either just going to get over it or realize that they're going to be that person, and the world is going to keep turning."

Set to some incredibly powerful vocals and instrumentals, the music video features adorable clips of each band member telling their mom just how awesome they are.

The idea for the music video came to lead singer Franklin after a few holiday drinks with family.

"I just became really aware of how much I appreciated [my mother] and everything that we've gone through as a family," Franklin says. "It took me some time and some growing to learn that she's not this perfect person, but at the same time she is because she's my mother. She's my hero."

"Do you know?
Oh, do you know?
Do you know how loved you are?"

According to Franklin, the band attempts to recognize that moms are not these perfect, untouchable humans, and coming to terms with this reality makes the love between a parent and child all the more powerful. To further that message of authentic human experiences, each mother reads a letter from their child on camera. Some of the letters ask for forgiveness and wisdom; others offer forgiveness for past mistakes and arguments.

The music video gave the band members a rare opportunity to recognize their moms as the humans they are — both flawed and wonderful at the same time.

"There's this saying that 'parents just don't understand,'" Franklin says, "I feel like that's a lie. I feel like it's us, the kids, that don't understand because we haven't lived this life. We haven't been through this yet. I know everybody's parents aren't great, but for the most part, what you should see [in your mother] is someone that only wanted the best for you and only wanted to protect you in this crazy world."

Franklin's point rings true for many. While everyone has unique experiences with their mother, the impact of motherhood is simply invaluable.

Many mothers work full-time, are often still responsible for many domestic responsibilities, and have an array of other different tasks and responsibilities to maintain. Yet, through it all, they find a way to offer a maternal love that comes in all ethnicities, sexualities, and identities.

While not everyone might have a great relationship with their mom, it’s important to recognize moms who have given their lives to being badass, awesome, empowering parents. Their sacrifices and love are invaluable.

Do you know how loved you are?

Call your mom, and I bet you'll find out.

Pexels / Julia M Cameron
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In the last 20 years, the internet has become almost as essential as water or air. Every day, many of us wake up and check it for the news, sports, work, and social media. We log on from our phones, our computers, even our watches. It's a luxury so often taken for granted. With the COVID-19 pandemic, as many now work from home and children are going to school online, home access is a more critical service than ever before.

On the flip side, some 3.6 billion people live without affordable access to the internet. This digital divide — which has only widened over the past 20 years — has worsened wealth inequality within countries, divided developed and developing economies and intensified the global gender gap. It has allowed new billionaires to rise, and contributed to keeping billions of others in poverty.

In the US, lack of internet access at home prevents nearly one in five teens from finishing their homework. One third of households with school-age children and income below $30,000 don't have internet in their homes, with Black and Hispanic households particularly affected.

The United Nations is working to highlight the costs of the digital divide and to rapidly close it. In September 2019, for example, the UN's International Telecommunication Union and UNICEF launched Giga, an initiative aimed at connecting every school and every child to the internet by 2030.

Closing digital inequity gaps also remains a top priority for the UN Secretary-General. His office recently released a new Roadmap for Digital Cooperation. The UN Foundation has been supporting both this work, and the High Level Panel on Digital Cooperation co-chaired by Melinda Gates and Jack Ma, which made a series of recommendations to ensure all people are connected, respected, and protected in the digital age. Civil society, technologists and communications companies, such as Verizon, played a critical role in informing those consultations. In addition, the UN Foundation houses the Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL), which advances digital inclusion through streamlining technology, unlocking markets and accelerating digitally enabled services as it works to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

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This year, we've all experienced a little more stress and anxiety. This is especially true for youth facing homelessness, like Megan and Lionel. Enter Covenant House, an international organization that helps transform and save the lives of more than a million homeless, runaway, and trafficked young people.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is Delivering Smiles this holiday season by donating essential items and fulfilling AmazonSmile Charity Lists for organizations, like Covenant House, that have been impacted this year more than ever. Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a charity of your choice or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

Courtesy of Macy's

Brantley and his snowman

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"Would you like to build a snowman?" If you asked five-year-old Brantley from Texas this question, the answer would be a resounding "Yes!" While it may sound like a simple dream, since Texas doesn't usually see much snow, it seemed like a lofty one for him, even more so because Brantley has a congenital heart disease.

On Dec. 11, 2019, however, the real Macy's Santa and his two elves teamed up with Make-A-Wish to surprise Brantley and his family on his way to Colorado where there was plenty of snow for him to build his very own snowman, fulfilling his wish as part of the Macy's Believe campaign. After a joy-filled plane ride where every passenger got gift bags from Macy's, the family arrived in Breckenridge, Colorado where Santa and his elves helped Brantley build a snowman.

Brantley, Brantley's mom, and Santa marveling at their snowmanAll photos courtesy of Macy's

Brantley, who according to his mom had never actually seen snow, was blown away by the experience.

"Well, I had to build a snowman because snowmen are my favorite," Brantley said in an interview with Summit Daily. "All of it was my favorite part."

This is just one example of the more than 330,000 wishes the nonprofit Make-A-Wish have fulfilled to bring joy to children fighting critical illnesses since its founding 40 years ago. Even though many of the children that Make-A-Wish grants wishes for manage or overcome their illnesses, they often face months, if not years of doctor's visits, hospital stays and uncomfortable treatments. The nonprofit helps these children and their families replace fear with confidence, sadness with joy and anxiety with hope.

It's hardly an outlandish notion — research shows that a wish come true can help increase these children's resiliency and improve their quality of life. Brantley is a prime example.

"This couldn't have come at a better time because we see all the hardships that we went through last year," Brantley's mom Brandi told Summit Daily.

Brantley playing with snowballs

Now more than ever, kids with critical illnesses need hope. Since they're particularly vulnerable to disease, they and their families have had to isolate even more during the pandemic and avoid the people they love most and many of the activities that recharge them. That's why Make-A-Wish is doing everything it can to fulfill wishes in spite of the unprecedented obstacles.

That's where you come in. Macy's has raised over $132 million for Make-A-Wish, and helped grant more than 15,500 wishes since their partnership began in 2003, but they couldn't have done that without the support of everyday people. The crux of that support comes from Macy's Believe Campaign — the longstanding holiday fundraising effort where for every letter to Santa that's written online at Macys.com or dropped off safely at the red Believe mailbox at their stores, Macy's will donate $1 to Make-A-Wish, up to $1 million. New this year, National Believe Day will be expanded to National Believe Week and will provide customers the opportunity to double their donations ($2 per letter, up to an additional $1 million) for a full week from Sunday, Nov. 29 through Saturday, Dec. 5.

There are more ways to support Make-A-Wish besides letter-writing too. If you purchase a $4 Believe bracelet, $2 of each bracelet will be donated to Make-A-Wish through Dec. 31. And for families who are all about the holiday PJs, on Giving Tuesday (Dec. 1), 20 percent of the purchase price of select family pajamas will benefit Make-A-Wish.

Elizabeth living out her wish of being a fashion designer

Additionally, this year's campaign features 6-year-old Elizabeth, a Make-A-Wish child diagnosed with leukemia, whose wish to design a dress recently came true. Thanks to the style experts at Macy's Fashion Office and I.N.C. International Concepts, only at Macy's, Elizabeth had the opportunity to design a colorful floral maxi dress. Elizabeth's exclusive design is now available online at Macys.com and in select Macy's stores. In the spirit of giving back this holiday season, 20 percent of the purchase price of Elizabeth's dress (through Dec. 31) will benefit Make-A-Wish.You can also donate directly to Make-A-Wish via Macy's website.

This holiday season may be a tough one this year, but you can bring joy to children fighting critical illnesses by delivering hope for their wishes to come true.

via Twins Trust / Twitter

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Simon and Graeme Berney-Edwards, a gay married couple, from London, England both wanted to be the biological father of their first child.

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