Watch Lin-Manuel Miranda's super catchy bilingual rap about voting.

There's never been a Broadway musical with a bigger impact than "Hamilton" — at least in recent memory.

And there has never been a more crucial presidential election in recent memory either. Marry the two and you get this powerful parody from the show's creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda.

Lin-Manuel Miranda taking a bow after one of his performances. Image by Nicholas Hunt/Getty images.


This summer, Miranda wrote and directed three videos to get out the vote. This is the first one he's released. It's a fun, hopeful, and oh-so-danceable rap inviting all of us to vote in November.

Check out the 30-second music video, featuring Miranda, posted on actor Javier Muñoz's Twitter page.

It's in Spanish, so here's the English translation:

"Come, my people, come, my people
It's time to elect a new president
Vote, my people, vote, my people
Raise your hand and say, "present!"
Come, my people, come, my people,
Don't let this country not count us all
Come, my people, come, my people
The 8th of November is at the forefront
Vote, vote — America!
The time is now
Decide who exists"









At this point, Miranda's popularity is a massive force to be reckoned with.

We've seen him hanging out everywhere from Broadway to the White House, and he's even hosting "Saturday Night Live" this October. So, yeah, he's kind of a big deal.

And he's also quickly gaining a reputation for using his high-profile status to bring awareness to the social issues that really matter, like voting. On Sept. 28, 2016, four "Hamilton" cast members even sat outside the Richard Rodgers Theatre to register people to vote.

Miranda's video is aimed in particular at the 27.3 million Latinos who are eligible to vote in the next election.

Out of those 27.3 million Latinos eligible to vote, 44% (almost half) are millennials. And because "Hamilton" is to millennials what "Rent" and "Les Miserables" were to theatre-goers of previous generations, Miranda's power is far-reaching.

And as for Miranda's personal views on this election? He's backing Hillary Clinton — even signing on for a star-studded Broadway event in her honor on Oct. 17, 2016. But regardless of who you're voting for, Miranda is determined, telling TIME magazine “Just get out and vote."

Let's listen to the man, shall we?

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Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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True

In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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Katie Neeves (L) photo by Jayne Walsh, JK Rowling (R) photo by Sjhill, CC BY-SA 3.0

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