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Watch this transgender comedian take down Trump on 'The Tonight Show.'

'He probably thinks transgender people are those cars that turn into robots.'

Watch this transgender comedian take down Trump on 'The Tonight Show.'

Believe it or not, Patti Harrison, a transgender comedian, can actually empathize with Trump's proposed military ban on people like her.

Sort of.

"Trump says transgender people in the military would be a tremendous disruption, and I get it," she said assuringly during a segment of "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" on July 26. "If you constantly draw attention to yourself, spend all day distracting everyone, and cost taxpayers millions of dollars, the perfect job for you isn’t the military — it’s the president of the United States."



Harrison was, of course, satirizing Trump's tweets announcing the U.S. military would no longer allow trans members to serve "in any capacity."

The jab was just one of a handful of searing burns, met with thunderous applause from the audience, criticizing the president's decision.


GIF via "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon."

"The Tonight Show" wasn't flying solo in its criticism either; several late night hosts lambasted the ban, too, including Stephen Colbert, Samantha Bee, and Seth Meyers.

But "The Tonight Show" was the only program to feature an actual trans person firing shots at the president's discriminatory proposal.

"I don’t even think Trump knows what 'transgender' means," Harrison quipped. "He probably thinks transgender people are those cars that turn into robots."

Harrison did, however, put the jokes aside at one point to highlight a person who'd be affected by the ban: retired U.S. Navy SEAL Kristin Beck.

"There are amazingly brave trans people that should be allowed to serve," Harrison noted. "Like Kristin Beck, a retired Navy SEAL with a purple heart, bronze star, and countless service metals."

Former U.S. Navy Seal Senior Chief Kristin Beck. Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Beck, whose used her transition to publicly highlight the need for the military to become more inclusive, quickly spoke out against Trump's announcement.

"He's turned his back on a lot of Americans," she told CNN. "He's turned his back on a lot of veterans. And that's just not right."

Beck — who was deployed in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other countries throughout her two decades as a Navy SEAL —  is calling on Americans to rise up and fight back at the ballot box.

"I'd say [Trump's] famous line: 'You're fired,'" Beck explained to CNN when asked what she'd tell the president. "As the American people, we can say that [to all our elected officials]. And in 2018, we can put out in a big loud voice, 'You're fired.'"

Watch Harrison's segment on "The Tonight Show" below:

Transgender comedian Patti Harrison address Trump's military ban

Posted by The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon on Thursday, July 27, 2017
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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.