When a bully went after his daughter, Kevin Smith demonstrated how to take the high road.

Kevin Smith is a successful screenwriter, filmmaker, actor, podcast mogul, and nerd king.

You may know him as Silent Bob from his films "Clerks" and "Dogma."

Kevin Smith in 2015. Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for New York Magazine.


He's also a father, and his latest film, "Yoga Hosers," stars none other than his 17-year-old daughter, Harley Quinn Smith.  

Harley Quinn Smith and her co-star Lily Rose Depp in "Yoga Hosers." Photo via Kevin Smith/YouTube.

Harley Quinn (who, yes, is named after the comic book character) is already semi-famous for being the daughter of a famous director, but she's been thrust further into the spotlight by starring in the film.

Unfortunately, that makes her a bigger target for harassment and disgusting comments.

When Kevin Smith saw a nasty comment on his daughter's Instagram, he reacted like any father would. Well ... almost.

What it's like to be my daughter: 17 year old @harleyquinnsmith_ received this message simply for the heinous crime of posting a pic of herself on @instagram. I have zero clue what the reference to #TheMatrix is all about but, wow - way to unload on a teen girl because YOU have nothing to do in life. But even though I should be apoplectic about it, my kid thought it was funny. "I'd be mad if I had a tiny dick and anonymous voice too," she said, bemused by the bitterness. But here's a nickel's worth of free advice for folks like this Troll: if you hate me (or my kid) this much, the better use of your time is to make YOUR dreams come true, instead of slamming others for doing the same. The best revenge is living insanely well - so if you wanna get back at a 17 year old girl for the grievous crime of enjoying her life, the best way to do it is to succeed in your OWN existence. Show the world WHY we should be paying attention to you instead of anyone else. Because randomly attacking others merely communicates how creatively and emotionally bankrupt you are. You think you have something to offer the world but others are getting all the attention? Don't bitch or punish the world: just create. Create something nobody's ever seen before and there is a good chance the world will notice you. Attacking teen girls on the Internet is the saddest form of masturbation that exists and requires no discernible skill or talent. You want attention? Don't make yourself mad, make something original and fun. Because if you're not being useful in this world you're being useless. Don't be useless: go make stuff that makes people happy! #KevinSmith #HarleyQuinnSmith #YogaHosers

A photo posted by Kevin Smith (@thatkevinsmith) on

“What it’s like to be my daughter: 17 year old Harley Quinn Smith received this message simply for the heinous crime of posting a pic of herself on Instagram,” Smith began. “I have zero clue what the reference to #TheMatrix is all about but, wow – way to unload on a teen girl because YOU have nothing to do in life. But even though I should be apoplectic about it, my kid thought it was funny. ‘I’d be mad if I had a tiny d*** and anonymous voice too,’ she said, bemused by the bitterness.” (All emphasis mine.)

As a professional comedy writer — and huge fan of profanity — Kevin Smith was all set for a curse-filled smackdown of epic proportions.

But instead, Smith went with a different approach. One that turned the focus to the commenter's own life:

"But here's a nickel's worth of free advice for folks like this Troll: if you hate me (or my kid) this much, the better use of your time is to make YOUR dreams come true, instead of slamming others for doing the same.

The best revenge is living insanely well - so if you wanna get back at a 17 year old girl for the grievous crime of enjoying her life, the best way to do it is to succeed in your OWN existence. Show the world WHY we should be paying attention to you instead of anyone else. Because randomly attacking others merely communicates how creatively and emotionally bankrupt you are.

You think you have something to offer the world but others are getting all the attention? Don't bitch or punish the world: just create. Create something nobody's ever seen before and there is a good chance the world will notice you.

Attacking teen girls on the Internet is the saddest form of masturbation that exists and requires no discernible skill or talent. You want attention? Don't make yourself mad, make something original and fun. Because if you're not being useful in this world you're being useless. Don't be useless: go make stuff that makes people happy!"





For Kevin Smith, encouraging an online troll to create something and make people happy is the perfect way to go.

Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images for IMDb.

After all, he was once just a movie-obsessed kid from New Jersey, hanging out at comic stores and pontificating about life. Then he made a film starring his friends and became one of the most influential indie filmmakers of the 1990s — perhaps of all time.

He found his happiness not by trying to make other people miserable, but by trying to delight them and make them laugh.

Studies show that cyberbullying is often the result of low self-esteem and loneliness. It's also been shown that creativity boosts self-esteem.

Maybe Smith knows that. Maybe he doesn't. But we all know you can't fight fire with fire.

The bully went low, and Kevin Smith went remarkably high.

Courtesy of Back on My Feet
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