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Why Ariel Winter chose a dress that showed her breast reduction scars.

Ariel Winter had breast reduction surgery. And she's not ashamed of it.

Why Ariel Winter chose a dress that showed her breast reduction scars.

In January, Ariel Winter rocked the red carpet at the Screen Actors Guild Awards in Los Angeles.

You might know her as studious middle child Alex Dunphy on the hit ABC series "Modern Family."

Winter was there to celebrate her show's two big nods — for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series and Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series (shoutout to her TV dad, actor Ty Burrell).


Unfortunately, chatter started soon after Winter's red carpet appearance when photos revealed scarring from a medical procedure.

The 18-year-old had undergone breast reduction surgery in summer 2015 — a decision, she told People magazine, that she's "extremely happy with."

Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP.

Not only had the size of her breasts been causing her pain, but she hated that her body had become more of a conversation topic than her acting chops.

"It made me feel really uncomfortable, because as women in the industry, we are totally over-sexualized and treated like objects," Winter told Glamour last August. "Every article that has to do with me on a red carpet had to do with 'Ariel Winter's crazy cleavage!' or 'Ariel Winter shows huge boobs at an event!' That's all people would recognize me by — not, 'Oh, she does great work on 'Modern Family.'"

As a human being with free will, Winter certainly shouldn't feel ashamed of her decision to do what's best for her and her health.

And on Sunday, as tweets began rolling in, she made that very clear.

Winter shared a message on Twitter clarifying her decision to strut the red carpet the way she did.

Yes, Ariel!

I mean, for real.

Let's just take a moment and let it out.

Why should Winter feel ashamed? Bodies come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and genders — and yes, plenty have scars, too. What's there to hide?

Winter has become an outspoken social media badass, joining other young female stars like Amandla Stenberg and Rowan Blanchard.

Beyond promoting major body positivity on Twitter (her tweet after the SAG Awards has been Liked more than 1,400 times, by the way), Winter made waves last month for slamming misogynistic homophobe Nash Grier, whose popular Vine account bolstered him to Internet stardom in recent years.


Upon getting backlash from Grier's fans for the tweet, Winter penned a poignant response explaining how he's used his platform to promote dangerous rhetoric for quite some time, harming women and the LGBT community along the way (that tweet got a cool 27,000 Likes, FYI).

When Winter's not slaying Internet celebrities for ignorant comments, she's supporting cool groups with awesome missions — like, say, Amy Poehler's Smart Girls, which helps empower young women to follow their dreams.

She chatted with them at the SAG Awards about why she'd prefer to fast-forward to the future than meddle in the past:


It shouldn't be a big deal that Winter showed off her scars on the red carpet. But in today's world, it still is.

When so many of us might cover up our insecurities in order to be red-carpet-ready, it's nice to know at least one star is comfortable in her own skin — scars and all.


True

In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

Who would have thought that giving the world access to all human knowledge via the internet, the ability to follow and hear from experts on any subject via social media, and the ability to see what's happening anywhere in the world via smartphones with cameras would result in a terrifying percentage of the population believing and spouting nothing but falsehoods day in and day out?

Those of us who value facts, reason, and rational thought have found ourselves at some of our fellow citizens and thinking, "Really? THIS is how you choose to use the greatest tool humanity has ever created? To spew unfounded conspiracy theories?"

It's a marvel, truly.

Between Coronavirus/Bill Gates/5G conspiracies and QAnon/Evil Cabal/Pedophile conspiracies, I thought we were pretty much full up on kooky for 2020. But apparently not. The massive fires up and down the West Coast have ignited even more conspiracy theories, some of which local law enforcement and even the FBI have had to debunk.

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True

In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

I worked as a substitute teacher in my early 20s, almost exclusively in middle schools and high schools—my age of specialty. Once, I accepted a two-day subbing assignment in a first grade classroom. Only once. Halfway through the first day, as the kids ate lunch in the cafeteria, I sat at the teacher's desk in an exhausted daze. Teaching little kids was a completely different animal than teaching big kids. While adorable, they had so many needs and so little attention span. It was like herding a bunch of flies that constantly needed to go potty.

Trying to herd those flies virtually during a pandemic is too much to even fathom.

So the real-time story that mom and writer Stephanie Lucianovic shared on Twitter of what happened when her son's second grade teacher dropped from the class Zoom call was not the least bit surprising. Hilariously entertaining, but not surprising.

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Katie Neeves (L) photo by Jayne Walsh, JK Rowling (R) photo by Sjhill, CC BY-SA 3.0

Dear JK Rowling,

I am writing this letter to say a big thank you to you. You may think it strange that a gobby trans woman such as me would wish to thank you after all your recent transphobic outpourings, but let me explain…

I certainly don't thank you for your lengthy essay last month where you describe the abuse you have suffered (for which you have my sympathy) and in which you stated that you do not hate trans people, while at the same time peddling even more anti-trans mis-information. Sadly, your diatribe directly caused some trans children to self-harm and other to attempt suicide.

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