Zayn Malik canceled a huge show. It was a very brave thing to do.

Zayn Malik had a big show lined up earlier this month.

The former One Direction heartthrob was supposed to take the stage at Summertime Ball in the U.K. on June 11, 2016. But it didn't happen.


Photo by Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images.

It was a huge event (especially for teens who are into pop music). Artists Ariana Grande, Nick Jonas, and Will.i.am were among the many A-listers who performed.

Malik's mental health, however, had other plans for the pop star.

The day of the event, Malik — who's only had a small handful of performances promoting his new solo album out earlier this year — posted a candid note to fans on Twitter and Instagram announcing he had to cancel.


"My anxiety that has haunted me throughout the last few months around live performances has gotten the better of me," he wrote, noting he's living with the "worst anxiety of [his] career."

"I know those who suffer [from] anxiety will understand," his message concluded. "And I hope those who don't can empathize with my situation."

Malik is far from alone in the struggle with anxiety.

Nearly 1 in 5 Americans are living with some form of anxiety disorder, making it one of the most prevalent mental health conditions in the U.S., according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

So Malik's honesty could make a real difference to others in the same boat — especially men.

Research suggests men are less likely to seek treatment for their mental health issues than women. There are a few realities that help explain this, from the backward social expectation that boys and men shouldn't express their emotions to the more general stigma applied to those who live with mental health issues.

It's a big deal when famous male stars speak up about what they're going through.

When Wentworth Miller opened up about his chronic struggles with depression and battles with suicidal thoughts, it felt like the whole internet was on his side.

Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Trevor Project.

More recently, actor Dominic Purcell, Miller's co-star on "Prison Break" and "DC's Legends of Tomorrow," encouraged other men to "talk it out," "see a shrink," and "be brave." Because those things worked for him.

Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images.

And Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson certainly deserves a thumbs-up for addressing his history of depression and reiterating to anyone going through tough times that "you're not alone."

Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for MTV.

It doesn't matter if you're a pop star, famous actor, or larger-than-life wrestler. Opening up about your mental health isn't a sign of weakness.

It's the bravest thing you can do.

Need help? Learn more and access care at MentalHealth.gov.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

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In the autumn of 1939, Chiune Sugihara was sent to Lithuania to open the first Japanese consulate there. His job was to keep tabs on and gather information about Japan's ally, Germany. Meanwhile, in neighboring Poland, Nazi tanks had already begun to roll in, causing Jewish refugees to flee into the small country.

When the Soviet Union invaded Lithuania in June of 1940, scores of Jews flooded the Japanese consulate, seeking transit visas to be able to escape to a safety through Japan. Overwhelmed by the requests, Sugihara reached out to the foreign ministry in Tokyo for guidance and was told that no one without proper paperwork should be issued a visa—a limitation that would have ruled out nearly all of the refugees seeking his help.

Sugihara faced a life-changing choice. He could obey the government and leave the Jews in Lithuania to their fate, or he could disobey orders and face disgrace and the loss of his job, if not more severe punishments from his superiors.

According to the Jewish Virtual Library, Sugihara was fond of saying, "I may have to disobey my government, but if I don't, I would be disobeying God." Sugihara decided it was worth it to risk his livelihood and good standing with the Japanese government to give the Jews at his doorstep a fighting chance, so he started issuing Japanese transit visas to any refugee who needed one, regardless of their eligibility.

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True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Welcometoterranova and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Welcometoterranova-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

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Gates Foundation

Once upon a time, a scientist named Dr. Andrew Wakefield published in the medical journal The Lancet that he had discovered a link between autism and vaccines.

After years of controversy and making parents mistrust vaccines, along with collecting $674,000 from lawyers who would benefit from suing vaccine makers, it was discovered he had made the whole thing up. The Lancet publicly apologized and reported that further investigation led to the discovery that he had fabricated everything.

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via Jess Martini / Tik Tok

There are few things as frightening to a parent than losing your child in a crowded place like a shopping mall, zoo, or stadium. The moment you realize your child is missing, it's impossible not to consider the terrifying idea they may have been kidnapped.

A woman in New Zealand recently lost her son in a Kmart but was able to locate him because of a potentially life-saving parenting hack she saw on TikTok a few months ago.

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